2 Cool Fishing Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been watchign here for a while and getting lots of great information. Now I have a question! I have a 21 foot Skeeter Baypro... and it's finally time to do some work on the trailer. The trailer needs new hubs, springs and shackles. I am thinking of adding trailer brakes while I am fixing ut up. What's better, the new disc brakes or the old style drum brakes? Keep in mind it has no brake system currently....

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The boat is supposed to weigh 1,875 lbs. dry, plus 52 gallons fuel, plus a 225 hp Evinrude FICHT outboard.... I am pulling it with a Toyota Tacoma 4x4 with the v-6 engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
it's a double axle trailer. Currently the lug nuts are just globs of rust, and the hardware holding the springs on does not look that great. Saltwater will do that though...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Little hint, when you do rebuild your trailer, go down to the local Wal-Mart and pick up some white spray-on grease from the automotive section and hose your trailer springs, lugnuts, rims, etc down liberally with it. Get about 6 cans and use them all. They're a lot cheaper than Corrosion X at about a buck and a half a can and they work a lot better. The grease will pick up dirt and road grime and turn into a nasty looking coating, but that will be pure armor plating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,114 Posts
I think that is for the hull by its self. Your total weight is probably closer to 3500. I would invest the money into a good set of ceramic pads and good tires for your truck, and just make sure you leave a good distance between you and the person in front of you. Brakes in saltwater are high maintanance and if you don't take care of them can be a pain but sure are nice when they work. How far do you normaly tow?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Currently I don't tow it that far, but that's because I know the tires are not in good shape. Once they are replaced, I will tow it farther from Alvin, to Galveston, Freeport and maybe down south. The disc brakes seem like they would be easier to keep clean since everything is more exposed than drum brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I don't have any experience with disc brakes (at least not on a trailer), but I just recently finished installing a complete new drum brake setup on my trailer. My trailer originally came with brakes, but there wasn't a usable component left on them; so I got new everything. For me, it was a big improvement, but bear in mine that my rig is probably tipping the scales a little north of 6000 lbs. Also, I'm taking it on an 8 hour tow into the Arkansas mountains for July 4th. Therefore, I'd say I have a greater need for trailer brakes than you do.

First thing you need to do is to verify that you will be able to fit either type of brakes to your existing front axle. For drum brakes, there needs to be a square shaped flange with 4 holes (1 at each corner). This flange should be located between the spindle (stub axle) & the main part of the axle on each side. It's where the backing plate bolts on. For disc brakes, I'd presume that you'd need some sort of caliper mounting bracket attached to the axle, but I can't say for sure. If there's nothing on your axle to which the brakes can be mounted, you'll need a new axle designed to accept brakes. If your axle will accept drum brakes, I'm not sure if there exists any sort of conversion kit that would allow you to fit disc brakes without changing your axle. If not, you'd need a new axle to go with discs as opposed to drums.

My setup cost me a total of about $250 with tax from Husky Trailer Parts on the South Loop @ Telephone. That's $100 for a new coupling with master cylider; $30 for a kit containing all the necessary hard lines (already flared, with fittings, & cut to length), the flex line, & T-fitting; $50 each for 2 complete drum brakes. Each one had the backing plate with the wheel cylinders, shoes, adjusters, & springs already mounted to it. All I had to do was bolt them to the axle. I also needed an additional 2' of line & a double female adapter because the line running from the M/C to the axle wasn't quite long enough, & I needed new bolts to mount the brakes to the axle. I'd presume that a disc setup would cost a good bit more, & I doubt you'd need the additional stopping power. As for maintenance, longevity, etc, I'll have to report back later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I did some research this morning, and the disc brakes use the same square flange that the drum brakes do. I don't think that eitehr axle has this. So unless the axles are in bad enough shape to need replaced, brakes may not be in the future. But if they do need replaced, I may go with disc brakes even though they are more expensive. At least they seem simpler for the cleaning standpoint. I imagine it's difficult to get all the salt water out of a drum brake setup, even with the flush kit installed. But I have never had brakes on a boat trailer before, so I am just guessing. Hubs, springs, all mounting hardware, wheels and tires are in the very near future no matter what. I wonder every time I take it the 15 miles to the ramp as it is....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
If your springs, hubs, etc are in really bad shape, you may find that your axles are rusted at each spindle's attachment point. If that's the case, new axles may not be a bad idea. I found mine to have some rust in that spot but they appear to be servicable (he says as he crosses his fingers). I was out of time & money; so I'll probably replace them next year.

When you go to replace the rest of the hardware, soak every fastener you plan to remove with PB Blaster the evening before you get started. Also, if you plan to replace all the nuts & bolts (which you should), go ahead & buy a nut splitter. I wish I'd had one when I did this job on my trailer. Some nuts were frozen on so hard that my impact wouldn't break them loose. On these, I had to use a pry bar with a cheater pipe, & I had to do that the whole way off, not just to break it loose. That made it a serious workout.

If you want more info on the pros & cons of disc vs drum, search the archives of www.thehulltruth.com The topic has been discussed at length over there.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top