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Did you see the size of that Chicken
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After Bluewaterdawg posting on the opah and starlinmarlin with his pomfret.
I thought it would be neat to see if anyone else has some pics of any really exotic or rare fish they have caught over the years.
 

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rabbit fishI have heard that fishes known as puffers are a delicacy. In a recent magazine article, however, the statement was made that puffers are highly poisonous. Should we or should we not eat puffers that we catch?
Metairie, Louisiana


It is unfortunate that fishes as delicate in flavor as the puffers should be so poisonous. This is a widely distributed family with many Pacific species having been implicated in human deaths. Puffer, or Tetrodon, poisoning is the most virulent form of fish poisoning known. According to Dr. Bruce Halstead, who has assembled information on poisonous fishes from all over the world, the overall mortality for Tetrodon poisonings is about 60%. Puffers occur throughout warm and temperate seas. They are highly prized as food in Japan, and they even appear in the United States markets at times. However, in Japan during the 10-year period ending in 1937, over 900 deaths were recorded from Tetrodon poisoning. From 1949 to 1951 nearly 400 cases were recorded with a mortality of 51%. Tetrodon toxin from Pacific species has been studied extensively. It has recently been characterized chemically. Less information is available on the poisonous qualities of Atlantic puffers, but Dr. Edward Larson of the University of Miami has studied the toxicity of the common Atlantic puffer, Sphoeroides maculatus. Although Dr. Larson reports that the- toxicity of puffers from the Miami area was not as great as from other east coast locations studied, local puffers were sufficiently toxic to cause two recent deaths in Miami. According to Dr. Larson, the most toxic portion of the Florida fish is the skin, followed by the liver and gonads. We recommend that puffers not be eaten.
 

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coastal said:
rabbit fishI have heard that fishes known as puffers are a delicacy. In a recent magazine article, however, the statement was made that puffers are highly poisonous. Should we or should we not eat puffers that we catch?
Metairie, Louisiana


Only if you want to fly it to Japan and have a licensed chef prepare it for about $500. And then you'll probably be disappointed, but at least not dead.
 

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Not too exotic, but I've actually always wondered what these were I was catching...may be hard to tell from the picture, but they had orangeish spots encircled with blue on the head and gill plates, and I assumed they were some sort of grouper, but couldn't identify them when I looked at pictures of grouper species....caught them in the rocks off a marina in costa rica..anyone know?

 

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BEER4BAIT said:
is a wierd one.
It's a sun fish very common up along the east coast....

Order: Tetraodontiformes

Family: Molidae

Genus & Species: Mola mola

APPEARANCE

The ocean sunfish looks a bit like a huge lima bean with its round and flat body. Its body, shaped like a millstone, appears to be part of the head, and so is often called the "headfish". It is also called the "moonfish" after its round appearance.

The ocean sunfish has an oval body that is flat and covered with thick, leathery, scaleless skin protected by a layer of mucous. It is grey, olive-brown, or nearly black with silvery reflections. Its fins are dark. It has a small mouth with a snout that projects beyond it. Its teeth on both top and bottom jaws are fused together to form a single, sharp-edged beak. It has large and high anal and dorsal fins. Its body ends in a low tail fin that is short and wavy.

The ocean sunfish may grow to be 11 feet in length, and can weigh two tons. The ocean sunfish is taller than it is long (fins included).

The ocean sunfish has a small brain: a 200 kg specimen may have a brain the size of a nut. It has a spinal cord 1/2 of an inch long.

HABITAT

Ocean sunfish are found in most of the world's tropical and temperate waters. They are usually found along the coastal areas where wrasse and gulls can rid them of parasites.

FOOD

Ocean sunfish eat crustaceans, starfish, jellyfish, sponges, mollusks, algae, plankton, squid, and small fish. They will eat basically anything. To eat, the ocean sunfish will slurp in food through its beak, shred the food to pieces, spit it out, and then repeat the process until the food is small enough for it to swallow.

ENEMIES

Ocean sunfish have few enemies. They are preyed upon by great white sharks, orcas, and sea lions. Sea lions will attack them ferociously, throwing them in the air like a Frisbee.

Man is another enemy. They mainly hunt ocean sunfish for sport, although this can be hard as the skin is so tough a Manchester rifle even has trouble penetrating it. They are eaten in Europe and Japan and their liver oil is of some importance, but they have never been hunted commercially. Their tough skin is covered with parasites. Gulls, wrasse, and othe fish rid them of the external pests.

SWIMMING

Ocean sunfish wave anal and dorsal fins in unison from side to side in order to move, twisting them slightly as they wave. The pectoral fins wave continually, but are probably just stabilizers. The tail is used as a rudder. In order to steer, the ocean sunfish will squirt a strong jet of water out of its mouth or gills. They are lazy swimmers, sometimes letting the current carry them. Occasionally, the current will carry them into cold water, where they die. When need be, they can dart quickly through the water. They can jump 10 feet into the air and can dive to depths of 600 feet.

BREEDING

Ocean sunfish are the most fertile of saltwater fish, being able to lay up to 300 000 000 eggs at a time. When, where, and how they mate is a mystery. When born, the larvae look like regular fish at 1/10 of an inch in length. The dorsal and anal fins then begin to grow and the body becomes covered with spines. These spines are then lost with only 5 remaining. These last 5 spines shorten until they disappear. Once they are gone, the bulky, disc-shape body begins to form. At this time the baby fish is only 1/2 of an inch long.

RELATIVES The ocean sunfish is not related to freshwater sunfish. It is closely related to the pufferfish. The sharptail sunfish, slender sunfish, and southern ocean sunfish are the only other three fish in the family Molidae.



John
 
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I saw some of these sunfish while out on a salmon fishing trip off the Queen Charlotte Isles (Canada). At first you think you see a shark cruising the surface with its dorsal fin out of the water. Once you get close, you can see what it really is. They get BIG. I understand they primarily eat jellyfish.
 

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From My Hotel in Raiatea Polynesia

Caught all these off the back deck of our over water bungalow. The number of species was completely mind blowing.
 

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I was in the surf in Belmar, NJ about 10 years ago when a sunfish was flopping around. At first everyone thought it was a shark and the panic was on. I recognized it to be a sunfish. I paddled out to get a closer look. The sunfish went under and guess where he decided to surface...about 2 feet from me. I paddled away then spun around to see where he was. Again about 5 feet from me he surfaced again. I then paddled out.
I know they are harmless and we have seen them before in NJ offshore, but when they are right next to you.....
 
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