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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Prince Rupert, Inner Passage, Klondike, Prince William Sound, and Kenai fishing

I flew into Prince Rupert BC on the 13th to meet my wife, kids, and inlaws for an Alaskan holiday. Prince Rupert is located 550 miles north of Vancouver, and is near the Canadian border at the southern tip of the Alaskan Panhandle. It is a small coastal town of 16,000 residents where forestry, fishing, and tourism are the major industries. The family had driven up from Houston to catch the Alaskan Marine Highway Ferry to Skagway. We had a day of layover in Prince Rupert before the ferry sailed. I was itchin to go fishin, and so were my 13 year old daughter, my wife, and my sister-in-law.

Before departing for the Klondike, we arranged a day trip with Captain Josh Temple of Prime Time Adventures (primetimeadv.com). Josh fishes BC in the summer for salmon and halibut, and in the winter the West Coast of Mexico for billfish and really big yellowfin. He is a very personable and capable guide, and loves to share his knowledge and enthusiasm about fishing and conservation. John runs a 22 foot Grady White with a 2004 Yamaha 250 and a 9 hp Yamaha trolling motor. His equipment is impecably maintained.

We fished two areas called Eagle Rock at Dundas Island, and Cayas Island. The technique for the trolling we used at Eagle Rock was called mooching. The presentation consisted of a slow trolled natural bait under down riggers at 40-60 feet on a 12 weight fly rod. Water depth was 80-300 feet. The fish were located in and around a small bay in the rock groins with a strong incoming current. For the structure-oriented fish, we dropped a basic snapper rig in 200 feet of water, and suspended the bait about 6 feet off the bottom.

To make a long fishing story short, Lynn put another whipping on me. She caught two Tyee chinook over 30 lbs, and an 8 lb soho. I managed a king around 28 lbs, a 16 lb halibut, a couple of Double Ugly’s (also known as a Quill Back Rock Fish), and a Yellow-eyed Snapper (the locals call them Red Snapper). The Sis-in-law got a 24 lb king and a small silver.

I will let some of the pictures tell the rest of the story……

  • Bald Eagle at the Prince Rupert marina
  • Eagle Rock
  • JB’s King
  • Lucky fishergirl
  • Double Ugly
  • 16# Halibut
  • Northern Most Manned Lighthouse in BC
  • Alaskan Frontier viewed from British Columbia
 

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What a trip! Old dad even got his head handed to him by the family fishing star once again....way to go Lynn! And I was not sure which one in the next picture was the Double Ugly..... (ducking). :slimer:

That was some magnificent scenery and great photography WBHB. Weather looked a little on the chilly side but it seemed you were dressed for it. Hope you have some more pics to post because it sure looks beautiful up there. Tell us about the cruise too.

And we don't want that overgrown flounder to show up again during the Fall Flounder Tournament. Frozen fish do not count!!

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
On to the Klondike

We hopped aboard the M/V Matanuska, a 400 foot passenger and cruise ferry that services the Alaskan Panhandle Islands. In two days of sailing, we stopped in 5 ports along the way to Skagway, including an extended stop in Juneau. In Juneau, we disembarked for a 2 hour whirlwind tour of the city in the most expensive taxi in the world. We visited Mendenhall Glacier and the local tourist traps before reboarding and heading North. Aboard, staff biologists gave seminars on the local sealife, the history of the region, the commercial fishing industry, glaciers, and an assortment of additional topics. After arriving in Skagway, we spent the night, rented a car, and drove back into Canada though British Columbia and the Yukon. The area is best known for the gold rush of 1898 where thousands of prospectors looked for untold wealth. Driving through the region, I can see how the fever can get to you.



  • Departing Prince Rupert
  • Unknown mountain along the inner passage
  • Ketchikan
  • Local Transportation
  • Taku Glacier
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mendenhall Glacier

  • Mendenhall Glacier
  • Mendenhall Glacier from Juneau
  • Waterfall along the Inner Passage
  • Welcome to the Yukon
  • Unknown lake
 

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I spent 2 years in Alaska in '67 and '68. I loved that place. I would have stayed but the Air Force had other ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
On to Alaska

We crossed back over the border into the 49th United State and heading to Tok. From there, we drove to the coast past some of the most incredible scenery. We stopped along the way to inspect the Alyeska Pipeline. Crossing over the coastal ridge, we entered Valdez where we boarded a boat and toured Prince William Sound. No sign of oil in this magnificent bay system. After numerous sighting of the local wildlife, we headed into Glacier Bay to view the Columbia Glacier upclose.

  • Unknown Mountain
  • Pipeline Facts
  • Pipeline
  • Another Glacier
  • Bridal Falls
 

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Imagery by RH Keeling
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Awesome trip and photos... be sure to tell the bear story w/ photos. Sorry about your water spill. Did you get a chance to work on the camera?

Thanks again. That oversized flounder tasted way too good!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Valdez to the Kenai

The next day, we departed Valdez for the long drive to the Kenai Peninsula. More incredible scenery abounded. We even stopped at a state park to get up close and personal with an alpine glacier. Arrived in Soldotna late in the afternoon, and departed from the family. They were heading up to Denali to see the tallest mountain in North America, Mt McKinnley. Allen and I had some fishy plans of our own.
  • alpine glacier
  • More Alaskan Pipeline
  • Mirror Lake
  • yet another glacier
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Alaskan Fishing Adventure - Day 1

I checked into our lodge in Soldotna while I waited on Al’s flight into Kenai Airport, and short 25 minute drive. We were staying with proprietors Bob and Tyna Ledda at All Alaska Outdoors Lodge (allalaska.com). Stopping by the office, I found the rod tube that I had shipped ahead via UPS. The latch was busted on the outside, so I suspected trouble immediately. After getting to my room, I found that 2 rod tips had been broken in transit, and another tip was bent very badly. On top of that, I had lost my Costa Del Mars somewhere between the ferry and glacier tour, so I was bummed. Tyna called to check on me, and said this was not a problem, as they have plenty of equipment to use.



The sun was just about ready to set behind the horizon when I picked Allen at the Kenai airport at 1:30 AM. Afterall, this was the land of the midnight sun, and it was 24 hours before the longest day of the year. We got back to our room and hit the sack.

Bob met us at the dock in front of the lodge at 8:15 AM. We piled in quickly in our transportation, and headed NNW across the Cook Inlet, crossing the marshy coastline, across the front range past active snow-capped volcanoes, and into the adjoining areas of the Bristol Bay Watershed behind the mountains. On the flight over, we viewed dozens of glaciers and small lakes and streams that started to really reveal the potential for fishing in this great State, and we had a birds-eye view of several brown bears hanging out on the grassy marsh area. We arrived at our first destination, and Bob descended in a figure eight and touched down softly on the calm waters of Twin Lake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Finally, some fishing for your die hards

We were welcomed by a park ranger at the shoreline, who informed us that the northern pike fishing had been outstanding the day before. Al didn’t waste a moment, and he was wading chest deep in the cool waters. He picked up 3 fish to about 35 inches in his first 10 casts on a Blue Fox Super Vibrax No 5. I followed quickly with two 40 inchers on a diving stick bait. In all, we caught 15 pike in about 2 hours of wade fishing with our light speckled trout tackle. By the way, when you hear stories about Alaskan mosquitoes, believe them or suffer the consequences. The highlights included Northerns charging like a torpedo, a release of tail-walking Pike, and a very bloody and sore thumb. It couldn’t get any better than this. Or could it?
  • Al's first Northern Pike
  • Me and Pike
  • Potlickers that flew in on us
  • Another nice Pike
  • Departing Twin Lakes
 

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2006 Skeeter Cookoff "2nd Place Brisket"
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Sir you are one fortunate man, only in my dreams could I ever experience the beauty and fun that you had.... I always thought Texas was Gods country, my views have changed from your pics......The Eagle pics were outstanding, the Pike was to die for.... I never thought that I would be so envious of another person, but I am now..... Glad you had the ultimate experience... I will catch a Halibut before my time is over, I promised that to myself..... Super great pics, thanks so much for sharing... Made my evening.....
 

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David,

Those pics are totally awesome! I can't wait to see the rest of your pics! Hearing about the trip on the phone was great but seeing your pics really makes me want to plan a trip even more! Were those pics from the camera that got wet?
 
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