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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a habenaro , chile pequine, and jalapeno pepper plants and I have noticed that they haveslowed down this year and all of the leaves are dwarfed , and all three plants look like they might not make it. I do not see any bugs. By the way these plants are very big and the lower branches seem to be ok but the upper new growth is all shrunken and dying, does anybody know what I might do to save these plants

thanks in advance
 

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My Tabasco peppers are doing the same. I don't know why. It hasn't happened to every one of them, just the tallest. Maybe they are just not adapted to cooler weather, but that should affect all of them. I hope we find out.
 

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When temps start dipping below 50 at night the hotter weather species die off.

Good book to read, Dave Dewitt, "The Pepper Garden"

Everything peppers! He has several others as well from cookbooks to specialty books on individual species to a compendium of all the known pepper species in the world along with accompanying seed sources "Peppers of the World".

http://www.amazon.com/Dave-Dewitt/e/B000AP7RWO
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks seattleman 1969 I will look into that!
but I find it kind of odd because my plants are about 2 1/2 yrs old and they stay out all winter and havent seen anything like this. I do not know what the life span of a pepper plant is, I do feed it miracle grow on occasion. not only are the upper leaves dwarfed the peppers are also dwarfed. the funny thing is that they are planted in differnt locations arround the outside of the house not even close to each other
 

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Most peppers are annuals but can to some extent be grow as perrenials under the proper conditions.

The only pepper species that is a true perennial is the "Pubescens" also known as manzano, canario, or caballo pepper. A unique species from the Andes that has no wild relatives as it has been cultivated for so long. A thick fleshy pepper with black or brown seeds and a slow starting, lingering fire that hits your mouth, tongue, and throat in a very different way.

Some pubescens can grow as long as 10-12 years and be 12 feet tall. They are used to cool temps and do best when the weather is warm during the day and cool at night, even near freezing! Texas summers will kill them, they have to be protected. I grew one on my patio in Seattle for about 7 years and it only died after being exposed to a snowstorm that hit when i was out of town and couldn't bring it in.
 
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