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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After this weekend, Kaylin and I have Plenty of Yellowfin steaks from our trip to Baja....

I want to cook up some yellowfin steaks for my mother this weekend... So i need a good recipe and instructions for cooking these steaks on the grill.. The plan is to have some ribeye and tuna for my mother and her husband

Thanks

Thomas

PS. I did a search, but couldnt find anything but wasabi
 

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This is the recipe Alton Brown did on his Tuna show. Simple and fast. The high heat on the charcol chimney cooks it perfectly. I tried it and it was great.



1/2 cup dark soy sauce
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup dry wasabi powder
2 pounds tuna loin, cut into 2 pieces
1/2 cup sesame seeds
2 tablespoons peanut oil



In a non-reactive bowl combine soy, honey, and wasabi powder. Reserve 1/4 cup for dipping sauce. Roll each piece of tuna in this mixture to coat evenly. Marinate from 1 hour to overnight. Remove the tuna from the marinade and discard the marinade.
On a plate, lay the sesame seeds. Roll the tuna in the seeds to evenly coat.
Fire up the chimney and top with a well-oiled grate. Sear for 15 to 30 seconds per side or to desired temperature. Remove to rack and rest for 3 minutes. Cover with foil or plastic wrap to achieve carry over cooking. Slice thinly and serve with the dipping sauce.
 

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sea monkey rancher
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buy dark seasame seed oil from viet market
ground black pepper
crushed garlic

roll tuna in above and let sit in frig for 1/2 hour, turn once

cook on grill until all sides are white, remove and cover w/ foil till ready to eat, tuna will continue to cook

should be red rare center if done correctly

eat on green salad with asian ginger or similar dressing, cover w/ sesame seeds
 

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Give it hell Remy!
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Blackened Tuna

Tuna steaks cut 1" thick
Melted butter
Paul Prudhomme's Blackened Magic Seasoning

Get cast iron skillet very hot. Dredge tuna steaks in the melted butter and lay them on wax paper. Apply a liberal amount of the seasoning to each side and throw into the skillet (you are better off doing this outside unless you have a commercial grade vent hood or a very accomodating wife :>) Turn when the tuna gets white halfway up the side and remove when sides are totally white. Cover with foil and let rest for 3 or 4 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thats ok Haute....

I actually have always used Blackened Magic seasoning for Tuna in the past.. But i have not been able to find it anymore.. krogers and walmart in galveston do not carry it anymore.

Where do you get yours

Thomas
 

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Give it hell Remy!
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They carry it at the HEB here. If you want I'll buy you some and send it your way next week. Just pm me with your address if you want some.


Blake
 

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Marinade in mix of soy suace, seasame oil, and ginger powder only need to marinade a few minutes. also don't use to much seasame oil as it is very over powering.
grill for about 1-2 minutes a side on a hot grill.
for dipping sauce mix 6 oz. sour cream 2 tablespoons of dry wasabi and 2 tablespoons of honey let sit for at least 1 hour in fridge you may add more wasabi if you like it hot.
Tuna is great by itself but dipping sauce puts it over the top.
 

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Hey, I'm a big fan of Chef Paul's seasoning...you can buy it at academy and it's a lot cheaper than anywhere else...I use his stuff for everything, chicken, pork, veggies, fish, steak, it's all good!!!

Now, to my recipie...

1 Cedar plank (from Wal-Mart, HEB, Academy, Lowes...just about anywhere)
1-1 1/2 lbs of tuna fillets
Soy Sauce
Garlic
Chef Pauls Seafood Magic
Coarse Sea Salt
2 Lemons

Sprinkle plank with coarse sea salt and place in water 1 hour prior to grilling. In the meantime, place tuna fillets in a pan (I usually use a cake pan), pour soy sauce over to taste (I usually use about 1/2 a cup), squeeze 1 whole lemon over the fillets, lightly season with Seafood Magic and Coarse Sea Salt then place in fridge until the cedar plank is done soaking.

Heat grill (gas or charcoal) to a med heat around 300 degrees. Place plank on gril salty side down for 3 minutes. Flip plank and lay the fillets on the plank. Shut grill and leave alone for about 5 minutes. I like my tuna more on the rare side but my wife doesn't at all. 5 minutes will usually make it about med to med-well. Remove the plank when cooked to taste, squeeze the remaining lemon over and around the fillets and serve on the table (over a pot holder of some sort). You'll get a great smoked flavor in a short amount of time and everyone will be impressed with the presentation. I like to serve it with fresh asparagus and mashed red potatoes with butter, sour cream, cheese and bacon bits mixed in.

Had this last night and dang, I could eat it again tonight.

Cameron
 

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First of all when butchering your tuna consider "blocking" the tuna as opposed to traditional "steaking" technique.

Primal cut of a tuna yield four quarters. Each quarter has a seam running down it which you can separate by running your fingers down it. This will remove the tenderloins which can be blocked. Trim them so that they are evenly retangular in shape. I find 1.5 pound blocks to be the most useful. Bag the trim for sashimi and sushi. I most prefer these blocks for grilling as they sear evenly and produce a nice balance betweem the crust and medium-rare meat.

The "shoulders" should be cut in 3 - 4 pound roasts. The can be slow cooked in the oven @ 200 degrees for a couple of hours until they are perfectectly medium rare all the way through (just like a prime rib of beef). The shoulders can be further cut into traditional steaks.

You should cook tuna steaks exactly the same way you cook beef steaks. My personal preference is rare-medium-rare. Most people who like medium-well beef do not like rare-medium rare anything.

The "belly flap" is known as "TORO" because of its' very high fat content. Remove the silverskin from inside the flap and square it off. Your fish will yield 2 blocks about 12 inches long and about 6 inches across about 4 inches thick. Many believe toro is the best cut for sashimi and sushi applications.

As for recipies - simpliest are to season with salt & pepper and baste with stuff like A1 or your favorite ketchup or mustard based bar-b-que sauces. The asian techniques so many refer to is simply an "asian bar-b-que sauce" (brown sugar; soy sauce; honey; sesame oil; fish sauce; etc).

Tuna is also quite good fried. I like cajun style sweet-heat picante-mustard wash rolled in combination of corn meal with rice and wheat flour and maybe a little coconut.
Easy dippin sauce is combination of orange marmalade (jelly) and horseradish with a little sweet sherry.

Finally, you can always figure in a garnish. My favorites are peach; sweet ginger; and fresh sage leaves drizzled with honey or a mango-citris-purple onion-jalepeno-honey mixture. Grill the fish and serve over garish.

Bon appetite!

1st_rate_mate
 

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Post note:

Also - most charter captains do not bother with extracting cheek meat; eyeballs; nodes above the brain nor take the time to scrape the bones. The liver is also quite tasty and useful.

In my opinion the scrapings from along the bones is the best meat of the entire fish. Simply take a large spoon and clean the bones make a special bag of this fantastic stuff. The cheek and node meats have a firmer texture which is prized among japanese as a delicacy.

The eyes are surpisingly tasty when poached in a court bouillion.

Finally - a few other important notes:

Do not ever expose saltwater fish to fresh water. The difference in salinity causes osmosis which degrades the meat. (Make's your prized catch taste like tap water - yuk!) Idealy have your charter captain add seawater to the ice in the holding tanks (coolers) for your catch.

I have also determined though years of trial and error that leaving the skin on does improve the freezer receptance of the fish. Simply remove it while it is still semi-frozen.

You are much better off using layers of cling wrap (press & seal preferred) as opposed to vacuum packaging. The vacuum causes a reverse osmosis and damages the cellular structure of the meat (as viewed under an electron microscope).

Best regards,

1st_rate_mate
[email protected]
 

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Quick and Simple Grilled Tuna

I cook my Yellowfin steaks the same way everytime. It is quick and simple and when we cook Ribeyes with them, there are always Ribeyes left but the Tuna is gone.
I like to make 1" steaks and cover the fish with extra virgin olive oil and sprinkle a generous amount of Adams Steak Seasoning. I pre-heat my grill to about 500 degrees and spray some kind of non-stick product on the grate.
I put the steaks on the grill and after a minute or so, give them a quarter turn to give them crossed grill marks. Repeat on the other side and cook until there is a little pink left in the middle, or to your desired doneness.
Quick, easy, and delicious. Works on Wahoo, Amberjack, Grouper, etc.
 

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HEB has it I buy it at least once a month...Chef Pauls blackened red fish magic "right??"
Texxan1 said:
Thats ok Haute....

I actually have always used Blackened Magic seasoning for Tuna in the past.. But i have not been able to find it anymore.. krogers and walmart in galveston do not carry it anymore.

Where do you get yours

Thomas
 

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Another simple recipe I use to grill YFT and albacore. Mix up a couple of packs of good seasons italian salad dressing mix (dried). Double the amount of vinegar and use balsamic. Marinate the steaks or loins in the refigerator for a couple of ours and grill. Always tasty.
 
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