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GOT WHEELS NOW
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1,226 Posts
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lotta good info on muzzy's here
http://www.prbullet.com/xmas09.htm
read about spit patch cleaning here
http://muzzleloadingbullets.com/muzzleloader_accuracy.html
After the shot, lick a clean, cotton patch. (yes, lick a patch; with your tongue) Place it wet side down on top of your barrel. Using your ramrod with a cleaning jag attached, work the patch in ever-lengthening strokes to the bottom of the barrel.
I could not think of a single hunting experience when I did not have time to follow my simple, accuracy enhancing, reloading process. Accuracy for me is to hit a golf ball at 100 yards off a benchrest ALL DAY LONG.
DON'T use any type of cleaner on the patch. Blackpowder and Pyrodex shoot much, much better on a fouled barrel than they shoot on a clean barrel. Using cleaner will remove the "first shot fouling". The "spit patch" will remove the excess fouling while leaving the "first shot fouling" on the barrel. Chronograph three - five shot strings with the same load. For the first string, do nothing between shots. For the second string, swab with a patch dampened with cleaner. For the third string, swab with a spit patch. You will be amazed at the results.
DON'T go hunting with a clean barrel. My best example of this is using Pyrodex RS on a clean barrel with a Knight Wolverine. The first shot out of a clean barrel can be as much as 6" out of the group at 100 yards. With that first fouling shot on the barrel, 1" groups are very common but on a clean barrel, that first shot can be anywhere in that 12" circle.
 

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good looking single member
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6,603 Posts
I have been shooting making and studying front stuffers for years. What people dont think about is.......after shooting and during the reloading process the barrel is cleaned, by running another round down with a patch or lubed bullet formed to the barrel. Swabing after each shot came about when the NON CARTRIDGE breech loaders came in to play like the Smith and Sharps when you shot a fully fowled barrel after each shot. Back in the 17th and 18th century a person with a rifle would never have it UNLOADED not even for cleaning in most cases. They would reload after each shot and when they had time they would clean the bore from the loaded ball to the muzzle. I have found almost 100% of all the antique flinters and capper I have found were 1 still loaded and if they were not the end by the breech plug was heavy pitted and the bore was fine. Happy shooting, I enjoy taking a deer or bird with mine every year.
 
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