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Motorhead
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183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is it OK to leave hog cut up on ice for a few days before de-boning and processing?
Does it help the meat same as with a deer?

Thanks
 

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Jacka$$ Moment
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848 Posts
I usually leave them quartered for at least 3-4 days packed in ice and bleeding the water off once a day, and turning the meat over once. Then I'll go ahead and de-bone the meat and soak it another few days, turning the meat over at least once. Total time, at least a week. If I'm making steaks, I bleed them in ice another day also until the water drains is light pink. The ice will freeze and make a "plate" on the top of the meat in the cooler, making it look full of ice. Make sure to break it up and keep plenty of ice down in the cooler on the meat everyday as well. At least that's how I do it and comes out fine and not gamey. I do deer the same way. Good luck.

Dook
 

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good looking single member
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6,603 Posts
If they did beef or chicken like that no one would eat it. I dont let meat touch water or ice. I bag the meat first, deer or hog then let it chill for a day or so. If the processor wants to soak my meat I go somewhere else.
 

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An Over 60 Victim Of Fate
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Yup, leave it in quarters with the back strap in ice but drain it daily. Don't let the meat sit in water.

TH
 

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"We're gonna need a bigger boat!"
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I usually leave them quartered for at least 3-4 days packed in ice and bleeding the water off once a day, and turning the meat over once. Then I'll go ahead and de-bone the meat and soak it another few days, turning the meat over at least once. Total time, at least a week. If I'm making steaks, I bleed them in ice another day also until the water drains is light pink. The ice will freeze and make a "plate" on the top of the meat in the cooler, making it look full of ice. Make sure to break it up and keep plenty of ice down in the cooler on the meat everyday as well. At least that's how I do it and comes out fine and not gamey. I do deer the same way. Good luck.

Dook
I do almost the same thing with the exception of leaving the drain open constantly. Also the last 2 deer and last 3 hogs we processed, we soaked in cool water for about a 1/2 hour immediately after quartering before icing them down. 2-3 days is generally all I let em ice down though, but have left em up to 6 days with GOOD ice with no ill effects.
 

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Tiny is Gone... Hi, My Name is ROGER
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5,886 Posts
I let my deer and hawgs sit in ice for at minimum, 1 week up to 10 days if I can't get around to taking care of the meat. Just drain the water daily and rotate every other day to make sure there is ice on the bottom.

If I had a walk in cooler, that would be my 1st choice.

You'd be amazed of how long beef sits in a cooler before actual processing......
 

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Fishing Guide
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Recommended by professionals for storing deer meat, you probably can do pork too.
They say either shrink wrap the meat or store it in baggies filled with water to prvent freezer burn. If storing it in water, I would not think soaking for short periods will hurt the meat or taste.
 

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The Jammer
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Last year I took my kid on a pig hunt, and the guide recommended layering the quarters with ice as said above, draining it daily and replacing the ice. Do this for 3-5 days.

When I took it to our processor, who by the way is in the domestic pig business (processes several hundred pigs per day) he said absolutely correct. That is the best way to get the best out of your meat.

THE "ALWAYS LISTEN TO THE EXPERTS" JAMMER
 

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I made a platform to fit in the bottom of my coolers and coverd it with foil. Put the meat in and cover with ice. It would keep it out of the water as long as I drained it every day or two.
 

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For outdoors men the most important factor is keeping it cool. In the field there is only so much you can do with the facilities at hand so we make do. There are three processes tied up in this thread. Prepping the meat, bleeding it and finally letting it age.

Walk-in cooler's are the best option but most don't have access mainly because it keeps the meat cool and dry. Why is that important? Keeping the meat cool is pretty obvious which is to prevent excessive bacteria growth - also called spoilage or decomposition. Hanging the meat in a dry place allows the excess blood to drain from the vessels which can inhibit the taste of the meat.

And then comes the process of aging. This is done with beef, venison, pork or anything other type of meat and this is an art form which involves letting the meat hang long enough to allow all the blood to drain out AND allows the bacteria to slowly break down the connective tissues and therefore makes the meat tender. Aging is almost an art form and requires constant attention to detail. The keys are temperature, dryness and time. This is why you see something like "dry aged beef", etc. on the menu's of the good steak houses and not "soaked meat".

Most hunters don't have the facilities, time or knowledge to prepare meat in this fashion so we improvise with coolers of ice. Do yourself a favor and don't soak the meat in water for days on end. Cold causes things to contract.....shrinkage. Meaning the blood will stay in the meat until it's the same temp as the water and then slowly leak out. What you're doing is infusing the tissue with water which removes much of the taste.

Instead try putting a bunch of ice in the cooler and then add 2 milk crates turned upside down and put the meat on top of them. This basically gives you a miniature walk in cooler and doesn't let the meat sit on the ice or in the ice water. And it's easy to take out the milk crates and add more ice as needed.

Sorry for the long response but granddad was a meat processor for many years and taught me a thing or two.
 

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Age in a refrigerator

We bought a cheap refrigerator and put it in the garage 6 or 7 years ago. All quartered game goes in there to age for 10-14 days at 34-35 degrees. You wouldn't believe how much better it tastes and how tender it gets. Also, we changed how we handle the backstrap and it made a huge improvement. DO NOT cut it off the backbone. Cut the ribs off at the edge of the backstrap leaving it on the bone. If you cut it off the meat is allowed to shrink up as it cools, making it tougher. When processing you'll need to cut off about 1/8" of the outer layer of dried meat on the quarters.
 

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good looking single member
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You may have a "processor" but I have a butcher A butcher is not a processor and a processor is not a butcher. If your boy says soak it you dont know how deer or pork taste or how to prepare it. Water destroys meat period, like whisky, water/ice destroys it. I want my deer to taste like deer like my lamb should tast like lamb.
 
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