2 Cool Fishing Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am happy that the guys in the kayaks are in their own division. It would be unfair for them to compete against the rest of us.

Look at the advantages:
1. They do not have to launch a HarborWalk..can go straight to the beach.
2. They can sneak right up on the unsuspecting tarpon.
3. They have no huge gas bill.
4. They do not have to reel the fish in... they can just reel up to the fish.

If they can figure how to get the tags in as the fish jump, the rest of us will not have a chance.

Best of luck to the yakers.

TC
 

·
Crazy Yak
Joined
·
353 Posts
Tarponchaser said:
I am happy that the guys in the kayaks are in their own division. It would be unfair for them to compete against the rest of us.

Look at the advantages:
1. They do not have to launch a HarborWalk..can go straight to the beach.
2. They can sneak right up on the unsuspecting tarpon.
3. They have no huge gas bill.
4. They do not have to reel the fish in... they can just reel up to the fish.

If they can figure how to get the tags in as the fish jump, the rest of us will not have a chance.

Best of luck to the yakers.

TC
Trust me, we're the least of your worries! Fishing from a kayak is much more difficult. Paddling 1-3 miles out is no easy task with all the gear for most, then you have to chase fish, hook up and get towed out to see 1-2 miles, and then come back safely. We have to watch the weather more closely and we can't react as quickly to changes because our top speed is about 4.5 knots. No one that I know of has caught a Tarpon from kayak, that's exactly why we're commited to this Tournament. If we had the equipment we could tag the fish but if a tag / support boat is nearby it's better for the fish. I'm new to chasing Tarpon and have only hooked up on 2 (6 days ago). Disadvantaged boaters--doubt it! I have another kayak if someone would like to give it a go!

1. They do not have to launch a HarborWalk..can go straight to the beach.
How are we supposed to get to the beach? It's a long paddile from HW. Then we have to rig up all of our gear and vice versa.
2. They can sneak right up on the unsuspecting tarpon.
True, if you can find them sitting 3 foot above the water.
3. They have no huge gas bill.
True also, but it's a workout.
4. They do not have to reel the fish in... they can just reel up to the fish.
True; however, we will be using lighter tackle.
 

·
Kayak fishing in Gulf of Mexico
Joined
·
15 Posts
Tarponchaser,

Hey man, thanks for the good luck wishes, we are going to need them.

Last Sunday, was our first time targeting tarpon and two of us hung in to three of them.......but we didn't land any.

You are right about slipping up on them as they were rolling and feeding all around us......then a power boat came by about 1/4 mile away and they disappeared.

Most of my experience is landing 5-7' sharks and big drum (black and red). I was surprised how my reel sounded when I hooked up on the first tarpon. Never heard that sound from it before and it took 1/2 of my line by the time I unhooked from the anchor. You talk about a sleigh ride, he pulled me and the yak about 400 yds in 4 minutes.

But tagging any we catch shouldn't be too bad as we will be sitting so close to them......if we can catch one.

Hope to meet you at the tourney......and thanks again for the good luck wish.
 

·
Crazy Yak
Joined
·
353 Posts
Gauging by our PB trip today the boaters don't have much of an advantage either. All fish were elusive today, that's fishing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the offer of the use of the kayak but a few years ago I promiced God that if I ever got back to land that I would never again get on anything that did not have an engine on it. I intend to keep that promice.

I guess that even if you are the first ones to the fishing area with all the other handicaps we will be about even. We have about 25 miles by water. You have 15 miles or less by land and a mile by water.

Congrats on the hookup's. You are gut hooked forever-- sorry.

Hook-up are great. I remember a Flip Pallot show where they were fly fishng in the Evergaldes for snook & redfish. A huge tarpon took the fly and took off... they lost it on the third jump. The old guide said " You got the best of it".
The jumps are great, the hour or so of pulling as hard as the line will stand on a dead calm day in August are memorable but not as great.

Hope to meet you guys. Again good luck cause you earn everything you catch.

TC
If it was easy, everybody would do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,257 Posts
I would never dream of fishing out of a kayak much less chasing tarpon from one, however any motard (crossbreed, moron and retard) that thinks a kayak is not disadvantaged might want to lay the crack pipe down pull the needle out of his big toe and give it a try. Finding tarpon is the hardest part of catching one, and then trying to stay with them in a kayak (without a trolling motor) while you try to get them to take a bait would be almost impossible. My hat is off to the kayakers, keep working out I'm going fishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,358 Posts
I'm pretty sure his original post was a joke - all the way around... I think somebody took it way too seriously.... People always laugh when they see there is a kayak division... my answer is always, "They asked for a kayak division, so they got one. More power to them."
 

·
Kayak fishing in Gulf of Mexico
Joined
·
15 Posts
Sunday four of us kayakers went out on a tarpon charter power boat and never even came close to being around tarpon. The closest we came was spotting one about 4-600 yds away and we just never could locate them. I believe they got power boat's number..............and probably will soon have kayaker's number.

My hook up in an yak last week probably is a life time event and I am grateful I had the experience. I am going to just keep fishing the way I always do and who knows maybe it will happen again!
 

·
COME AND TAKE IT
Joined
·
11,378 Posts
Animal Chris said:
It may not be this weekend, but I feel confident that there will be a tarpon taken from a kayak.
There have been a few tarpon caught from kayaks along the Texas coast, but very few on purpose. The size and the fight of the fish is not the problem. We often catch fish much larger. The problem is finding them, and getting a hook to stay. The major disadvantage from a kayak is that you do not have enough weight to set the hook. Needless to say our hookup ratio out of kayaks is very poor. The general ideal is braided line, and smaller hooks to make up for the kayak moving during hook set. This is the same problem of any large fish species that we target from kayaks, but tarpon tend to be the worst about it because of the way there mouths are built.

Major advantage for kayaks is that we do not scare the tarpon once we find them. In fact most of the time they will come over to us to take a look.

There is a danger factor to any water sport. It could be argued by kayakers that our motors never break down,or run out of gas. At most we have a few miles to paddle to saftey. Boats are faster, and in worst case you could beach the boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I doubt there's any way to find it, but there was a thread on 2cool a year or two ago with pictures of some guys landing tarpon from kayaks. I'm pretty sure they were fishing in Fl. I also think they had some short videos of the fight and release. Check utube. You might be surprised.
 

·
Big Fish Wish!
Joined
·
162 Posts
I am with Animal Chris on this one...there will be one caught on purpose from a kayak...and I am betting this season someone will. Theres a small contiengent dedicated bunch out there and sooner or later things will fall into place. Good luck guys! I will try to join you in the hunt!

Peeshnuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Peesh I agree with you. It'll be a matter of perserverance though. Unless we paddlers have a location of an unmolested school under wraps, finding the darn things, as always will be the biggest obstacle. I've got my plan for the tourny, if the fish cooperate, fantastic. If not, I still have an excuse to fish for two days and target a personal dream of mine from the yak. Heck, I just do tournys for the raffles anyway. Good luck to everyone, we'll see you friday.
 

·
Big Fish Wish!
Joined
·
162 Posts
I think thats the same question the power boaters asked when we started catching trophy trout and reds from the yaks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,677 Posts
Jolly Roger said:
The major disadvantage from a kayak is that you do not have enough weight to set the hook.

Major advantage for kayaks is that we do not scare the tarpon once we find them. In fact most of the time they will come over to us to take a look.

There is a danger factor to any water sport. It could be argued by kayakers that our motors never break down,or run out of gas. At most we have a few miles to paddle to saftey. Boats are faster, and in worst case you could beach the boat.
JR,
Safety is first and foremost in my book. I have to disagree with those that state "our motors don't break down or run out of gas". Conditions can change quickly out there and a two mile paddle can seem like it's a hundred, and in those conditions it may become extremely difficult to fuel up the engine. As far as the motor breaking down well, let's just say that "if it can happen, it will happen...at the most inconvenient time", so be prepared.

If you fish with circle hooks, you don't need much weight to "set the hook". First off, I wouldn't set up with a heavy strike drag. When you get a strike, the fish will turn and start swimming away from you and as he does so, dip your rod toward him until he starts stripping the drag. At this point, begin reeling, keep the line as tight as possile, and slowly raise the rod. Once the fish has completed his first run, you can add a little drag, or just use your thumb and get ready for a San Luis Boat Ride. If you feel you have to set the hook, don't rear back but use short quick strikes and keep reeling while you do it.
It is true that you have a stealth advantage from a kayak, but you are at a distinct advantage from mobility and elevation stand point. Finding the fish is one thing, but keeping up with them is a completely different beast challenge. The best days I have had tarpon fishing off the Texas coast were because we could go to where the fish were when we spotted them. The ablilty to get the bait infront of the fish and keep it there is the key to cacthing these magnificent beasties.

I wish all the kayakers the best of luck in this tournament. You've got one he** of a challenge and hats off to you for accepting it. I look forward to seeing and visiting with you at the get togethers and BBQ.

Tight lines, Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,257 Posts
I like using as tight as drag as I can without breaking the line. Seem to get a better hook up ratio. Even in a kayak I think it is essential to have a tight drag for the initial run. Allot of times I never even pick up the rod until the fish has cleared and reentered the water. Same for sails and marlin. At that point really does not matter whether you keep the rod up or down, the hook is set.
 

·
COME AND TAKE IT
Joined
·
11,378 Posts
Safety is why kayak fishermen fish in groups and stay in contact with each other. We fish on a buddy system, if your buddy hooks up. You reel in and go with him. If anything happens then there is always someone within talking distance.

I have given up on circle hooks for tarpon from a kayak. I have used circle hooks for many years surf fishing and kayak fishing They work very good on certin fish. But after many failed attemps I will not waste any more of my time with them from kayaks for tarpon. But I hope someone this weekend can prove me wrong from a kayak.

A storm can catch anyone on the water. You will always have two options, ride it out or fight it back to the launch. This is true for any water craft. Lightning bothers me more then wind. Anything below a sustained hurricane I can take, have already done it a few times.

I can cheat on the elevation up to a point. I have in the pass drove many miles of beach glassing the near shore waters until I find what I am looking for. This technic is highly effective, and very easy. I can cover many miles of beach scouting for the next day, and set up camp. Or have the kayak loaded and ready on the rack and launch in a matter of seconds. By doing this I can cover as much water as a boat does, but my range of sight is limited to about the first two miles from the beach, depening on conditions. Most often I do this when glassing shrimp boats, but looking for birds, and such it works just as good.

Video of some guys in the sunshine state fishing for tarpon from kayaks
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v609/Nikita/?action=view&current=07819feb.flv

Animal Chris said:
JR,
Safety is first and foremost in my book. I have to disagree with those that state "our motors don't break down or run out of gas". Conditions can change quickly out there and a two mile paddle can seem like it's a hundred, and in those conditions it may become extremely difficult to fuel up the engine. As far as the motor breaking down well, let's just say that "if it can happen, it will happen...at the most inconvenient time", so be prepared.

If you fish with circle hooks, you don't need much weight to "set the hook". First off, I wouldn't set up with a heavy strike drag. When you get a strike, the fish will turn and start swimming away from you and as he does so, dip your rod toward him until he starts stripping the drag. At this point, begin reeling, keep the line as tight as possile, and slowly raise the rod. Once the fish has completed his first run, you can add a little drag, or just use your thumb and get ready for a San Luis Boat Ride. If you feel you have to set the hook, don't rear back but use short quick strikes and keep reeling while you do it.
It is true that you have a stealth advantage from a kayak, but you are at a distinct advantage from mobility and elevation stand point. Finding the fish is one thing, but keeping up with them is a completely different beast challenge. The best days I have had tarpon fishing off the Texas coast were because we could go to where the fish were when we spotted them. The ablilty to get the bait infront of the fish and keep it there is the key to cacthing these magnificent beasties.

I wish all the kayakers the best of luck in this tournament. You've got one he** of a challenge and hats off to you for accepting it. I look forward to seeing and visiting with you at the get togethers and BBQ.

Tight lines, Chris
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top