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www.RipCharts.com
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I came across an interesting discovery while looking at the RipCharts True Color satellite imagery this afternoon. I noticed this darker brown area along the coast caused (presumably) by Ike's storm surge. Its interesting to see that it stretches pretty far into Louisiana too.

 

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Standing on a Whale fishing for Minnows
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South Houston area would of been totaled out big time.

Good post.. Just goes to show you the power and destruction in from God and mother natures perspective...

another
TOM WEBER said:
Interesting, lines up with the bad side of the storm.. Imagine if it had followed the original projected path and come in south of Freeport..TW
 

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Cutter said:
I noticed this darker brown area along the coast caused (presumably) by Ike's storm surge.
definately from ike's storm surge. it's all of the mud and sand that was deposited inland after the water receded.

interesting image. thanks for posting.
 

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Texas Rod Builders
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...and all the dead vegetation that normally does'nt see saltwater intrusion.
mastercylinder said:
definately from ike's storm surge. it's all of the mud and sand that was deposited inland after the water receded.

interesting image. thanks for posting.
 

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mastercylinder said:
definately from ike's storm surge. it's all of the mud and sand that was deposited inland after the water receded.

interesting image. thanks for posting.
No offense but it is not mud and sand. I am living over here in Jefferson County and what that picture shows is where the saltwater intrusion occured. The brown area is dead vegetation. I am not talking about the normal dormant brown seen in the winter. If you have a chance to drive Hwy 73 you will see what I mean. You go from green and normal around Englin Rd to dead, every bit of plant life, until you cross Taylors Bayou and get behind the levee. After the surge came in the weeds, then grass, then trees died and turned dark brown. All the grass then turned black. Everything is now decaying along with millions of tons of cane, and marsh grass pushed in by the storm. The cattle ranchers south of Hwy 73 are in bad shape. The cattle that were not killed in the storm have absolutely nothing for feed. There were about 20,000 head between Winnie and Pot Arthur south of 73 before the storm, about half survived. The ponds, canals and ditchs are filled with salt water. They are all having to sell out or find pasture land elsewhere, if they can afford it. I have been told it will be several years before the grass returns and rice can be grown in these areas. With the focus of the storm on Galveston/Houston these folks have been forgotten. Funny thing is one of these ranchers is a good friend. When I asked him what he was going to do he said, " We will just have to work harder and longer but we'll manage." He never said a word about asking for goverment assistance or griping that he wasn't going to get a FEMA check. This is a guy that had a 7' storm surge blow his house to pieces and wash his truck 150' into a ditch. Sorry, I just realized I had hopped up on the soapbox. I'm over it now.
 

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Yep it's saltwater vegetation kill. We've even got a little down here in ditches and stuff from the extremely high tides that Ike produced.
 

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Freelance Gynocolgist
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All the trees in Galveston were going brown this past weekend, as is said above this is from vegetation.
 

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Storm surge south of Houma (another 50mi or so east of the picture) went over the 10' levees. LOTS of homes/camps flooded with mucky surge fluid. This area was Gustov's landing zone to which Ike induced even more severe damage than Gustov's direct hit the week before.

Storm surge doesn't tolerate much in it's way.

SwampRat!!
 

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www.saltgrassretrievers.c om
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Thanks for beating me to the box !! It's crazy how folks get all drawn into how many windows were blown out of a Houston skyscraper but then they gripe and wonder why thier steaks cost 10 bucks more.!

True americans only need a hand up...not out.

tokavi said:
No offense but it is not mud and sand. I am living over here in Jefferson County and what that picture shows is where the saltwater intrusion occured. The brown area is dead vegetation. I am not talking about the normal dormant brown seen in the winter. If you have a chance to drive Hwy 73 you will see what I mean. You go from green and normal around Englin Rd to dead, every bit of plant life, until you cross Taylors Bayou and get behind the levee. After the surge came in the weeds, then grass, then trees died and turned dark brown. All the grass then turned black. Everything is now decaying along with millions of tons of cane, and marsh grass pushed in by the storm. The cattle ranchers south of Hwy 73 are in bad shape. The cattle that were not killed in the storm have absolutely nothing for feed. There were about 20,000 head between Winnie and Pot Arthur south of 73 before the storm, about half survived. The ponds, canals and ditchs are filled with salt water. They are all having to sell out or find pasture land elsewhere, if they can afford it. I have been told it will be several years before the grass returns and rice can be grown in these areas. With the focus of the storm on Galveston/Houston these folks have been forgotten. Funny thing is one of these ranchers is a good friend. When I asked him what he was going to do he said, " We will just have to work harder and longer but we'll manage." He never said a word about asking for goverment assistance or griping that he wasn't going to get a FEMA check. This is a guy that had a 7' storm surge blow his house to pieces and wash his truck 150' into a ditch. Sorry, I just realized I had hopped up on the soapbox. I'm over it now.
 

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tokavi said:
No offense but it is not mud and sand. I am living over here in Jefferson County and what that picture shows is where the saltwater intrusion occured. The brown area is dead vegetation. I am not talking about the normal dormant brown seen in the winter. If you have a chance to drive Hwy 73 you will see what I mean. You go from green and normal around Englin Rd to dead, every bit of plant life, until you cross Taylors Bayou and get behind the levee. After the surge came in the weeds, then grass, then trees died and turned dark brown. All the grass then turned black. Everything is now decaying along with millions of tons of cane, and marsh grass pushed in by the storm. The cattle ranchers south of Hwy 73 are in bad shape. The cattle that were not killed in the storm have absolutely nothing for feed. There were about 20,000 head between Winnie and Pot Arthur south of 73 before the storm, about half survived. The ponds, canals and ditchs are filled with salt water. They are all having to sell out or find pasture land elsewhere, if they can afford it. I have been told it will be several years before the grass returns and rice can be grown in these areas. With the focus of the storm on Galveston/Houston these folks have been forgotten. Funny thing is one of these ranchers is a good friend. When I asked him what he was going to do he said, " We will just have to work harder and longer but we'll manage." He never said a word about asking for goverment assistance or griping that he wasn't going to get a FEMA check. This is a guy that had a 7' storm surge blow his house to pieces and wash his truck 150' into a ditch. Sorry, I just realized I had hopped up on the soapbox. I'm over it now.
Soapbox or not. Good info and great insight. Thanks
 

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And dont forget anothr storm went through there earlier. I am kinda confused where yur red mark I think showing the eye or impact area. Didnt think it was that far east. I know it was a big eye but it passed over Tiki, Galveston, Boliver, Dickinson, etc.

Charlie
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
CHARLIE said:
And dont forget anothr storm went through there earlier. I am kinda confused where yur red mark I think showing the eye or impact area. Didnt think it was that far east. I know it was a big eye but it passed over Tiki, Galveston, Boliver, Dickinson, etc.

Charlie
Hi Charlie, actually the red mark is a measurement line, used to give some perspective on how far inland the brown vegetation spans (about 12 nm).


You are correct, Gustav rolled through the delta region not long before Ike which may have compromised some of the coastal areas prior to ike. Here is a comparison of the coast before and after Ike.
 

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It's going to be tough on the ducks in the marsh from Anahuac to middle LA with all that salt intrusion. Anahuac refuge changed dramatically for years after a TS (francis???). Ducks quit using it, as did I.
Well off the bluewater forum, but a certain impact of this mass destruction. Maybe the middle coast will have a banner year??
 
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