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the first line, the last line or the fact this was sent to me my a commercial fishing advocate.....

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Fishing Just for Fun Damages Stocks, Study Finds
Thu Aug 26, 2004 02:01 PM ET

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent WASHINGTON (Reuters) - People fishing for sport are doing far more damage to U.S. marine fish stocks than anyone thought, accounting for nearly a quarter of the catch from overfished species, researchers said on Thursday.

And for the "charismatic" species that saltwater enthusiasts really go for, the impact is even more dramatic, the researchers found.

The researchers said recreational fishing takes 59 percent of the red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, 93 percent of red drum in the South Atlantic and 87 percent of bocaccio on the Pacific coast.

"With over 10 million saltwater recreational anglers in the U.S., and recreational fishing activity growing as much as 20 percent in the last 10 years, their aggregate impact is far from benign," said Will Figueira of Duke University in North Carolina, who worked on the study.

They hope their report, based on U.S. government data and published in the journal Science, will provide a wake-up call to regulators and to fishing enthusiasts about the damage being done to fish stocks.

"The conventional wisdom is that recreational fishing is a small proportion of the total take, so it is largely overlooked," said ecologist Felicia Coleman of Florida State University, who led the study.

Duke's Larry Crowder noted the impact of recreational fishing was startling both to researchers and the anglers, who often head out to sea in boats operated by professional guides and equipped with sonar devices and global positioning systems to locate the fish.

"Recreational anglers are operating below the radar screen of management. While the individual may take relatively few fish, we show that a few fish per person times millions of fishermen can have an enormous impact," he said.

When they looked at fish designated as species of concern by the U.S. government, sport fishing accounted for 23 percent of the take by weight, Coleman said.

MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

The researchers call for more effective regulation of sport fishing.

"I don't think they are saying anything new," Mike Sissenwine, director of scientific programs at the National Marine Fisheries Service, said in a telephone interview.

"I didn't know what the (overall) number was, nor do I think that anybody cares. But we were very well aware that for some species the impact is important, and therefore it is taken into account in fisheries management."

In April, the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy issued a report saying North America's oceans are in serious peril due to pollution, overfishing and poor management.

"Yes, we already do regulate recreational fisheries," said Andy Rosenberg of the University of New Hampshire and a member of the commission.

"But there has been an increase in recreational fishing. More people want to do it and more people have access to the coast," he said in a telephone interview.

Rosenberg agreed that more comprehensive regulations are needed.

Nearly half the coastal states do not require salt-water recreational fishing licenses.

Catch-and-release programs may not help, either. The report cites NMFS data that show 20 percent of released fish end up dying. And many individual fish are caught repeatedly.

"A Goliath grouper near one of my study sites had 20 hooks in its mouth," said Coleman.

"Bringing up a 400 pound (200 kg) fish onto your boat creates a marvelous photo opportunity, but it undoubtedly causes enormous physiological stress on the fish. And catching it is about as exciting as pulling up a Volkswagen."

The Recreational Fishing Alliance, a Washington-based lobby group, had no immediate comment on the report.
 

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one more and then I am done............

Shrimpers not impressed with feds' plan

By Melissa Rivera
The Daily News

Published August 27, 2004

Galveston County shrimpers agree that the National Marine Fisheries Service’s plan to revive the struggling shrimp industry is lacking.

On Monday, Texas shrimpers gathered in Houston to provide feedback on the proposals, which include limiting the number of shrimp boats in the Gulf of Mexico, a moratorium on new licenses, government buyback of licenses and boats and the promotion of wild shrimp instead of farm-raised shrimp.

Ronald Hornbeck of Bolivar Peninsula and a member of PISCES, an organization of commercial fishermen in Galveston Bay, said the new proposal is not heading in the right direction and not everything is being taken into consideration.

While some groups argue that there are too many shrimp boats increasing the “bycatch” of other marine life in the trawls, Hornbeck said the boats need to be out there to sustain the bay system.

“If you don’t have enough boats to stir up the water, it will cause build-up, go dead and produce nothing,” Hornbeck said.

Hornbeck also said that the Parks and Wildlife Department was only looking at “pressure points,” organizations that have more money and a louder bark.

He said the dominating group was the sport fishermen, and so far, agencies are only looking at the situation from their point of view.

But Hornbeck said regulators should “look and do for the state of Texas â€" not for me, the sport fishermen or beachgoers, but the state of Texas.”

Imports are another issue the industry has been battling. They make up 87 percent of the market, which lowers the price of shrimp.

This may not sound like a bad thing to consumers, but operating costs are increasing for shrimpers and that is eliminating profits for many of them. Hornbeck said some shrimpers do not catch enough to offset escalating fuel prices.

Shrimp prices have declined 27 percent in the Gulf of Mexico, and imports have increased, but the National Marine Fisheries Service said it is something shrimpers will have to deal with because imports will always be a part of the industry.

That is why the fisheries service hopes to promote the purchase of wild shrimp as opposed to farm-raised shrimp.

“Imports should not even be allowed in the United States,” said Bubba Werner, also of PISCES. “They are filled with chlorophenocol, which over time could build up a person’s immunity to antibiotics.”

Galveston shrimp seller Nicole Valastro said there was no comparison between wild shrimp and farm-raised shrimp: wild is better. Farm-raised shrimp taste bland, Valastro said, adding she would never sell them to her customers.

“Try eating shrimp without ketchup, tarter sauce or batter â€" just plain boiled shrimp â€" and you will see that farm-raised tastes like ****,” Valastro said.

Galveston County shrimpers seem to think the same thing â€" that the proposals are only scratching the surface of the problem.

“They don’t look at the big picture because it would take away from big money,” Werner said.

Public meetings will be conducted across the Gulf and South Atlantic coasts through early September to discuss and make changes before a final plan is devised.

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Under Review

Proposals the shrimp industry and public will review from the National Marine Fisheries Service:

• Decrease in the number of boats in the Gulf.

• Permit and license moratorium.

• Promotion of domestic shrimp instead of imports.

• Government buyback program of licenses and boats.

 

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Mont said:
the first line, the last line or the fact this was sent to me my a commercial fishing advocate.....

"A Goliath grouper near one of my study sites had 20 hooks in its mouth," said Coleman.

"Bringing up a 400 pound (200 kg) fish onto your boat creates a marvelous photo opportunity, but it undoubtedly causes enormous physiological stress on the fish. And catching it is about as exciting as pulling up a Volkswagen."
These two quotes by the same person are contradictory. Obviously, he's never been fishing before. Show me a VW that can get hooked and break off at least 20 different times. Goliath grouper don't get the size they do by being weak. And cars don't fight back like fish do.
 

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aka Salty Nacho
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Mont said:
one more and then I am done............

“If you don’t have enough boats to stir up the water, it will cause build-up, go dead and produce nothing,” Hornbeck said.
BWAHAAAAHAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA..........That's the funniest thing I've heard all week.

Mont said:
Galveston shrimp seller Nicole Valastro said there was no comparison between wild shrimp and farm-raised shrimp: wild is better. Farm-raised shrimp taste bland, Valastro said, adding she would never sell them to her customers.

“Try eating shrimp without ketchup, tarter sauce or batter â€" just plain boiled shrimp â€" and you will see that farm-raised tastes like ****,” Valastro said.
I wonder if there is any truth to this. My guess is that there may be some truth to it, but not like she's making it out to be. I'm sure farm-raised shrimp don't taste like ****.
 

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Mont said:
The researchers said recreational fishing takes 59 percent of the red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, 93 percent of red drum in the South Atlantic and 87 percent of bocaccio on the Pacific coast.
"42.7 percent of all statistics are made up on the spot." Steven Wright

MEGABITE
 

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The grouper with 20 hooks in its mouth needs to play the lotto considering that a supposed 20% of all released fish die. Shouldn't that red drum number be 100%. I thought it was illegal to fish commercialy for them.
 

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NaClH2O said:
BWAHAAAAHAAAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA..........That's the funniest thing I've heard all week.

I wonder if there is any truth to this. My guess is that there may be some truth to it, but not like she's making it out to be. I'm sure farm-raised shrimp don't taste like ****.
Well, 10yrs or so ago there use to be a shrimp farm in Arroy City. My uncle sold them their "feed". You'll never guess what it is...

Pasteurized chicken poop.. That's right, Chicken dung baked into pellets. lol

A buddie of ours ran a bait shop in Mansfield and heard about an accedent at the farm. Seems one of the workers opened the wrong valve and drained a whole pond full of those prongs into the river. So we took my buddies shrimp boat up the arroyo and caught serveral hundred pounds of them. He couldn't sell them as food but we ate um anyway.
Those things were huge! And they didn't taste like chicken.
--Hop
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
“If you don’t have enough boats to stir up the water, it will cause build-up, go dead and produce nothing,” Hornbeck said.
yea, right, the only reason we have bay fishing is because of shrimp boats. There weren't any fish or shrimp before then. I need to talk to this guy about a couple of bridges I have for sale.

If you talk to the old timers, they will tell you about catching red snapper from small boats off the beach. Guess where those are now, yup, in the trawlers nets. Same goes for the bay, you could catch all the shrimp you needed with a cast net. Not any more, even 60 foot trawls being dragged with 671 diesels aren't productive. They must think we are all mushrooms ;)
 

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Lol

From the first article....

When they looked at fish designated as species of concern by the U.S. government, sport fishing accounted for 23 percent of the take by weight, Coleman said.
I reckon red snapper is designated a species of concern - but wait, arent' we supposed to be getting 49% of the overall catch! This guys says only 23? Stop closing our fishery for half a year then! !$##$#%*@!

Tsip

Hop, man, I hope you deveined them buggers! LOL.
 

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I am so glad we have shrimpers around now. I can't imagine how our bays survived for tens of thousands of years without them.
 
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