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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Guide Lines Take 2

As the pattern for much of June and early July would have it, I was once again awakened periodically throughout the course of the night to a brilliant display of lightning illuminating the bedroom interior, only to be followed by the piercing clap of thunder, and the accompanying torrential downpour of rain. As 5:00 am rolled around, the rain had stopped, and it was time to meet today’s party of four for a quick wake-up cup of coffee and a strategy session for their upcoming day on the water. As the gentlemen walked through the door, the fact that they too had experienced an uneasy night’s rest was transparent, and their long-faces telegraphed their anticipated fear that today’s trip may be postponed due to too much rain, and for their fear of the possibility of there being too much freshwater in the bay system for a prosperous outing. Fears shared by many a coastal angler, but inclement weather knowledge and fishing tactics shared by few. Unbeknownst to me and my party, today’s trip would prove to be a true learning experience for all of us, discovering new freshwater strategies that would consequently result in a spectacular finale.

In this Guide Lines I want to share my experiences while discovering freshwater strategies. With water being off color, and tasting like tap water from the faucet, several of our wades that day only produced one trout per session. While motoring down an area shoreline, I noticed a long illusion looking slick snaking out in front of a bayou. The water around the slick was being pushed out of the bayou by the strong South wind, and showed signs of small ripples. The snaking slick was approximately 150 yards long, and bait was jumping nervously throughout the calm slick. I turned the boat on its side and made a large circle back towards the bayou. We slowly motored into the bank, set the anchor, and eased into the water. Shoulder-to-shoulder, our group walked towards the opening of the bayou. After making several empty casts, I tasted the rippled water only to find more freshwater. Once our lures hit the slick water, we immediately were hooked up with trout. The bite was noticeably better. Each time we brought in a trout, the jig heads were inside the fish’s mouth. I tasted the slick water and almost gagged due to the abundance of saltwater. In my opinion, the back lakes are less impacted from freshwater because of their physical location. With strong South winds overnight, the tides were falling out. The fish were following the saltwater and moved out to deeper water on the shorelines. With our day-to-day changing environment, one has a choice to run to a different bay system, or figure out strategies that will produce fish.

Now, let’s talk about top water action. There is nothing like the anticipation of experiencing a large Redfish exploding upon a surface walking plug. No matter how salty your blood vessels are, when that initial explosion occurs, it always stops your heart for a split second. With blow-ups on top water lures, there are instances when the fish misses the lure. The fish is normally trying to wound the bait, and with this action comes a mystical reaction. This is what we top water junkies call missed blow-ups. When this phenomenon occurs, I suggest you have the following baits in your arsenal of lures to help you get more hook ups, and less missed blow ups. Remove the back treble hook while leaving the split ring on the top water. Now, add one more split ring to the existing split ring. Place a # 4 red off-shank worm hook to the spit ring, making sure the worm hook is pointed up. You now should basically have two split rings, and one # 4 red worm hook on the last eye of your top water lure.

Due to the numerous routine family and job commitments presented to them in today’s hectic world, many recreational coastal anglers are not blessed with the luxury of picking that one, perfect-weather weekend for their fishing ventures to the Texas Gulf Coast. Bad weather has known to cause many to shun the mere adventure altogether, wagering ahead of time that their fears of the unknown freshwater affect shall greatly reduce their odds of their prospects. However, and as challenging as it may seem at the moment, taking the time to learn to fish effectively in the presence of adverse weather conditions can prove to have a most rejuvenating affect on turning long-faces into ear-to-ear smiles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Summer Is Time For Kids Fishing

Here recently we had the pleasure to have several families bring their young kids fishing.

Young 8 year old Cameron Campbell of San Antonio holding a 25" trout that he caught by himself. He was fishing with Guide TJ Christensen July 8, 2004.

young Joseph and Kyle Gephart of Leander along with Cameron showing off their catches.

Twin boys and older sister son's and daughter of Danny McCaines of Houston, fishing with Guide Jake Huddleston July 8, 2004.
 

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