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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Its 5:00 am as I apply full throttle to the big 225hp Mercury, steering the bow of the Extreme into the early morning San AntonioBay darkness. Upon exiting the bay canal leading away from the Lodge, I wonder to myself if today’s venture shall prove to be a repeat of the past two days. Wondering if I’ll be forced into determining how to explain such an unexplainable Summer time fishing pattern to today’s party of three. A summer fishing pattern unlike any I’ve ever experienced. Where large, empty-stomach Trout seem to be congregating directly against the shoreline water during the heat of the cloudless days. Everyday is an education out on our area bays, and figuring out the effects of the local weather and winds, the tides, and the recent rainfall accumulations can sometimes make it very difficult to recognize any distinct fishing pattern whatsoever. As of late, I’ve made special note of the fact that the bay waters continue to hold extreme amounts of fresh water as close as 50-100 yards off of the shorelines, but that the shorelines themselves are holding the salty solution we’re normally used to seeing in a bay system. Is this the reason for these Trophies holding so close to the shore, or are other elements a factor as well? Will I lose another 8+ pounder to a break-off in ankle-deep water for the third day in a row? Let’s find out…

If you had an opportunity to read the previous Guide Lines, you might remember that I stressed the importance of being able to familiarize yourself with freshwater strategies. With the enormous amounts of rainfall that were experienced during the month of June in the Texas Hill Country and Coastal Plains areas, we are, unfortunately, still not completely rid of the resultant freshwater runoff. Significant amounts of freshwater continue to plague those areas absent of the luxury of direct Gulf water exposure and discharge, but saltwater migration has made progress since my last writing in that the area back lakes are no longer the only source of saltwater, as saltwater may now be found directly up against the immediate shorelines. What can this be attributed to? Well, the mere massive amount of rainfall is definitely a key contributor, but the wind and tidal currents play just as much of a role in the overall equation and end result (our current water status). When such a large body of water (such as a bay system) is forced to empty into a separate container (the Gulf in this instance) via wind, and or tidal movement, and through such a narrow opening (jetties, passes, etc.), the product is the formation of the funnel-effect. If you ever pour spent engine oil through a funnel, you can note that the big, centralized portion of the oil mass experiences the majority of the movement, whereas the amounts of oil located directly on the edge of the funnel experience a minimal amount of movement. This funnel-effect is contributing to the immediate shorelines holding the bay’s supply of saltwater. How does one explain the phenomenon of 8+ pound trout in calf-deep water during the hot summer months? I have come to the conclusion that this small stretch of water that runs parallel to the shoreline is protected enough from the winds and fresh water. Let’s say these undulating grassy sand bars hold better salinity, and more food to attract big trout. Unlike the skinny water shorelines, the secondary shorelines are subjected to more changes because of the proximity.

I know you think I’m grinning like a teenage drag racer when I talk about Norton’s lures. Is it just me, or does every other plugger become excited when a new color surfaces out on the market? It’s funny to hear about anglers asking each other, “Hey, have you found any Mardi Gras?” The hottest new color for me is about to be unveiled in this Guide Lines. If you thought the talk of the Mardi Gras was crazy, "buried deep in the Norton color arsenal, which is now over 65 colors, I have discovered my most recent top producer Margarita." The Margarita is a very loud, transparent lime chartreuse-pepper color. Trust me, having three separate break offs, three days in a row, will cause a man to either loose his hair, or will turn it gray. After watching two small, round slicks pop on the shoreline, I leaned towards Jeff Knox and Jeff Lindenberger, and said, “Guys, I will be right back.” I walked from waist deep to ankle-deep water, and made one cast to a “push” that was disturbing small mullet. When the Margarita lure hit the water, the big girl exploded on the lure like a porpoise attempting to wound baitfish. This is one of the most memorable experiences I have ever had because I know the other trout that broke me off earlier were easily pushing well over the 8 pound class.
 

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Hey Captain, I'm just curious what kind of line are you using? what pound and do you use a shock leader? I have been contemplating of getting away from using the shock leader and going to higher pound rated line. Your comment please..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Knots, shock Leader, And Line

draker3,

I have been using the same setup for about 4 years without ever having a break off. The drag was set loose enough not to allow a break...Getting all that out of the way, let's move forward.



I use BG 12 lb. mono on reel, 20 lb. FC tied to 12 lb. mono. Use a DS knot. I also tie a loop knot to the jig head.



I think this is the issue. We're talking about calf-deep water. When a big trout gets hooked in such shallow water over hard sand, one typically experiences a violent strike. Who knows J



CM
 

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Capt. Chris Martin said:


I use BG 12 lb. mono on reel, 20 lb. FC tied to 12 lb. mono. Use a DS knot. I also tie a loop knot to the jig head.

CM
Hey! I use the exact same setup. :cheers: Inadvertently imitating a pro is a good sign in my book. Nice to know that I am doing something right.
 
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