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We all have it coming......
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God questions
by John Fischer



"God is too good to be unkind, too wise to make mistakes, and too deep to explain himself." - Unknown

Have you ever thought about the fact that God doesn't have to explain himself? Or as Paul put it, "Who has known the mind of the Lord? Or who has been his counselor?" (Romans 11:34)

Think about how often we ask or hear the following:

Why did God allow this thing to happen to me?

Why would God allow such pain and suffering on this planet?

If there is a God, why doesn't he do something about the injustice in the world?

And then think about our attempts at answering these questions while God remains silent. We not only throw questions and challenges at him, we have the audacity to think we can speak for him as well!

The worst part about this is that we act as if we deserve answers to these and similar questions. We even go so far as to suspend belief in God until we get these questions resolved to our satisfaction. Wait a minute: This is the God of the universe we are talking about. Who do we think we are? Some of this is almost on the level of grabbing a teenager by the ear, sitting him down in a chair, and saying, "Well … aren't you going to explain yourself, young man?"

What we are missing here is a relative level of humility commensurate with some acknowledgment of who we are (and are not) and who God is. In whose book is God required to explain himself? Not in any book I know of.

Moreover, in the book he left for us, the Bible, one of its oldest stories is about a righteous and good man who was afflicted with severe loss, pain, and suffering for no apparent reason. For the bulk of the book of Job, Job listens to four friends trying to figure out his predicament. After 37 chapters of justifications, accusations, and defense, they are no closer to an answer than when they started. That's when God shows up on the scene and speaks for himself. And in four more chapters, he refuses to give one shred of evidence that he intends to answer their questions. What he does present them is a series of more questions that Job, in his finiteness cannot answer - questions that establish himself as God with no requirement to explain himself, and Job, as a mere man with limited understanding and no right to know.

In the end, Job utters these words: "You asked, 'Who is this that questions my wisdom with such ignorance?' It is I - and I was talking about things I knew nothing about, things far too wonderful for me … I had only heard about you before, but now I have seen you with my own eyes. I take back everything I said, and I sit in dust and ashes to show my repentance." (Job 42:3, 5-6 NLT)

One of the most fundamental steps of believing is deciding we are not God nor do we want to be. That's when we get down on our knees and worship God as God. That posture is the beginning of finding out.

 

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Kayak Fisher
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7,565 Posts
TXPalerider said:
One of the most fundamental steps of believing is deciding we are not God nor do we want to be. That's when we get down on our knees and worship God as God. That posture is the beginning of finding out.
As it is written, "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom."
 
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