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Does anyone have any simple advice on protecting your garden greens from freezing? Since the weatherman is predicting the temp to drop in the low 30's for a few nights this week. Just wanted to protect my weeks of garden work. Other than throwing an old bed sheet over them, not sure what else I can do. thanks....
 

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If you are talking about collard, turnip or mustard greens, don't worry about it. It takes temps well below freezing to damage them. I don't know just how low it would take to cause any damage, but I've had them go through 29 degrees without showing any stress. Actually a light freeze will improve the flavor a lot as it makes them sweeter. This is true of all three, but particularly true for collards.
 

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Winter Freezing

Too late now, but next year get a good garden book which presents the killing temperatures of vegetables.

Plot out your garden according to temperatures to congregate similar tolerant temperature vegetables.

Make a cover from plastic sheeting and PVC large enough to cover them.

I made two kinds: one that folds out of the way and the other in a solid piece. I like both.

On those cold winter nights place the frame over the perishable(that's the name I was thinking about) as long as the temperature is too low. Use it for Summer to shade tender plants. It will last 2-3 years.

According to the old garden legends, a freeze helps the flavor of some vegetables. Freezing makes some of them taste better but spoil faster.C2
 

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It really depends also on how long you will be having temps below 32. we are expecting at least ten hours of freezing weather. I will be picking alot of my Mustards today and storing them properly in the freezer...... good luck..
 

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No problem for any member of the cabbage family... Even the lettuce & carrots came trough unscathed. Only thing that got hit were the tops of the potatoes & I expected that. Just leave 'em in the ground & they'll continue to grow...

I did cover the tomatoes but that was it.
 

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We hit 22 degrees and Brock, cabbage, brussels sprouts, carrots, onions, turnips, beets, and radishes all made it just fine. The last few years, we've had winter vegetables all winter long...but there is always the danger of one of those killer freezes where the temps get down in the low teens and stays below 30 for many hours...that usually kills everything.
 
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