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Discussion Starter #1
anyone see the news this morning about the 15' Great White that's trapped in the New England area? i think it was Massachusetts. they said it must have gotten in the cove during high tide during feeding time and gotten trapped when the tide went out. some scientists tagged it with a satellite transmitter. it was swimming around the boats and they said it was very docile.
 

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I think I saw it on cbs news last night...It looked really cool...Too bad that wasn't
Goose Creek in Baytown...
Jackie
 

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Photos available

I put some photos up on my website newenglandsharks.com on my White sharks in New England page. Scroll down near the bottom. - Tom
 

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Re: Coolio.

Greg Skomal, MA State Marine Biologist, managed to tag the GW with a special transmitter, I think it's a first (tagging) for the species in Atlantic waters.

From what I've heard and been told, I suspect more frequent vists from the big boys in years to come, given the ever increasing Seal population on the shores of SE Cape Cod,.... don't 'ya think Capt. T?
 

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Cool Story

I saw that story on the news too. That shark was beautiful. I hope they can get some good data from the tag. I didn't hear was sort of tag they used. Hopefully it has a radio transmitter.

Pope
www.texasfishreport.com
 

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What are the odds that this is the same shark that was spotted off of Rodanthe, NC earlier this summer? If I recall, it's about the same size. I'll have to search the web, but a large white was spotted in maybe May off NC, then a large white was seen a little farther north a few month later.

Same fellow, just following the coastline?

joe l.
 

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Transmitter

Hi Pope and Surfrat and others

The type of transmitter put on the shark will record information and will not transmit it on a daily basis.

The transmitter is programmed to release from the shark in
April 2005.

When it reaches the surface it will start to transmit data as to where and when the shark was, and other information.

SR- 7 PM tonight ESPN the Oak Blufs shark tournament. - Tom
 

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Monday, October 4, 2004

FALMOUTH, Mass. - The 15-foot great white shark that patrolled a Cape Cod
lagoon for nearly two weeks finally left for open waters Monday.

The 1,700-pound female shark swam through the inlet between Naushon and
Monohansett islands and into open ocean early Monday afternoon.

The state's Division of Marine Fisheries had tried for days to coax the
shark out of the lagoon, stringing a series of nets and electronic repellant
devices in the water.

The shark was first spotted Sept. 21 near Naushon Island, off the
southwestern coast of Cape Cod.

Scientists attached an archival satellite tag to the shark's dorsal fin,
marking the first time a great white has been outfitted with such a device.
 

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Satellite Tag Releases Prematurely From White Shark

Researchers Hopeful that Other Tagging Opportunities will Occur



Days after a large female white shark was coaxed from a shallow embayment in the Elizabethan Island chain near Woods Hole, Massachusetts, the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries (MarineFisheries) received satellite signals that suggested the high-tech tag placed on the 1,700 pound female white shark on September 23, 2004 released too soon.



MarineFisheries, is now convinced satellite information sent by the archival tag placed on the great white shark clearly indicates that the tag had detached. “We are disappointed that the satellite tag has released from the white shark prematurely,” said Greg Skomal, the MarineFisheries’ Biologist and shark expert who tagged the shark. “We will not get the information regarding this white shark that we had hoped for, but we did learn a lot during the time we studied the shark and we hope to learn more about other white sharks through future tagging efforts.”



The tag was programmed to release from the fish on April 1, 2005 and should not have been transmitting to the satellite until that date. After a thorough analysis of the data retrieved from the tag, MarineFisheries personnel concluded that the tag detached ahead of time due to the lengthy period the shark spent in the shallow embayment.



An internal mechanism within the tag allows the tag to detect changes in depth and if those changes are not large or frequent, the tag “thinks” that the fish is dead and initiates detachment. Unfortunately, the shallow water encountered by the shark during the last three days of confinement caused the tag to initiate detachment and it floated to the surface and began transmitting data. With the early release of the tag, additional information from this great white shark is not likely.



The appearance of this great white off Woods Hole has resulted in a significant increase in the exchange of information between MarineFisheries’ staff, other researchers, fishermen and the general public regarding white sharks. MarineFisheries is confident that the exchange of information will continue and they will be informed if other large sharks are sighted in coastal waters in the future providing further opportunities for tagging and research.



In addition, MarineFisheries is using the archival satellite tags in critical research about the movements and habitat use of the endangered North Atlantic right whale. On September 24th, MarineFisheries scientists and researchers from the University of New England successfully tagged two basking sharks, which while completely different species from right whales, share remarkable similarities in their seasonal habitat preferences. This ecological overlap affords scientists a unique opportunity to increase their knowledge of right whale movements without potentially harming or harassing the endangered right whales. The two recently tagged basking sharks should release their tags on January 31, 2005, and MarineFisheries researchers look forward to the information they will gather, which should prove extremely valuable in important management efforts concerning the endangered right whale.

 

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Re: Well,....

Yeah, it's too bad about the tag. I had a long talk with Greg Skomal yesterday afternoon on MV and he was pretty dissapointed about it, he told me when he tagged the GW, he had absolutely no idea the girl would stay in that inlet in water that shallow for as long as she did, evidently there is a feature in the device that can be disabled, regarding the shallow water reading, thinking that the shark is dead.
 
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