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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've received a lot of requests for this recipe due to the recent bread thread on the main board, so I figured I'd post it here. I never expected so much interest in bread making, LOL!!!

While there are a number of different 'Italian' breads, 'Filoncino' is considered by many to be a classic Italian bread... and it's drop dead simple:



'Filoncino'

3 1/2 Cups unbleached bread flour
1 1/2 Cups water
1 Tsp. instant yeast
2 Tsp. sea salt
1/4 Cup yellow cornmeal

Combine the flour with the yeast, sea salt & 1 1/2 cups of warm water. The dough should come together, forming a somewhat sticky, smooth ball. Add a little more flour if the dough is wet or a little more water if it is dry. Let it rest for 5 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto the counter & knead it for about 5 minutes, then shape it into a ball & transfer it to a floured bowl; sprinkle it with a little flour & turn it to coat with the flour on all sides. Cover and let rise at room temperature for 2 hours or until the dough doubles in bulk. (Or let the dough rise in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours, remembering to bring it to room temperature before shaping it & letting it rise a second time.)

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured counter. Cut it into 2 equal pieces & shape each into a ball, making sure you don't press out all the air bubbles that have developed (leaving air bubbles intact ensures larger air holes once the bread is baked). Cover with a towel & let rest for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven with a baking stone in it to 475 degrees.

Pat 1 ball of dough into a flat 1-inch high rectangle measuring about 4 inches x 5 inches. Fold the side furthest from you over toward you & seal the seam using the heel of your hand. Turn the rectangle 180 degrees & fold the side furthest from you over toward you; seal the seam using the heel of your hand. Fold the resulting log in half lengthwise, sealing the edges with your fingertips. Roll into a 14-inch-long cylinder with slightly tapering ends. Repeat with the ball of dough. Cover with a towel & set aside to rise at room temperature for 30 minutes; the cylinders should increase by half their size.

Slash each cylinder diagonally at 3-inch intervals with a sharp knife or a razor blade. Sprinkle lightly with flour. Place on a baking peel that has been sprinkled with the cornmeal & dust with flour. Slide onto the baking stone.

Lower the oven temperature to 450 degrees. Bake the bread for 25 minutes or until it is golden brown & crisp, misting with water from a spray bottle 3 times during the first 10 minutes of baking. (Close the oven door quickly each time to prevent the steam/heat from escaping & the bread from deflating).

Cool the bread on a rack & serve at room temperature. It is especially good with Italian Dipping Oil. Enjoy!!!

 

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Question for you: Since this recipe makes 2 large loaves, would this work if made into either 6 or 8 smaller loaves, size of hoagie buns? Or is this the wrong type of bread for a smaller loaf?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The recipe will make 2 baguettes or 1 larger loaf. But to answer your question regarding using it to make hoagie buns, you certainly can, however you would need to adjust the baking time & monitor them closely.
 

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Success!

I baked this recipe today. It is terrific! Easy to make and tastes great with the dipping oil. I bought 5# of King Arthur Bread flour to make it. We had it as an appetizer while we cooked the meal. The neighbor came over and we gave him a bite and he loved it. The main meal was beef tenderloin coated in Dijon mustard and cracked peppercorns with a cream and cognac sauce, garlic mashed potatoes, and a wedge of iceberg lettuce with Marie's Chunky Bleu Cheese dressing. We enjoyed a Chilean Syrah with the steak. Thanks for the recipe.

We are going to try the remainder of the loaf as French toast tomorrow morning.

Do you have any more bread recipes that are this good??
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, I have a wide variety of them, although this is the most simple one. What are you looking for???
 

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tsp = teaspoon.
Thanks Ranch, I'll give it a try. Whether it's bread, or rolls, or pizza dough, pretty much all of my bread baking goes on a 1 tbst yeast, 1 c liquid, 1 tsp salt ratio. The only exception is things that use a sponge or ferment for several days.

Will have to give this a try with the smaller dose of yeast!
 

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You wouldn't have a recipe for suka would you? might have spelled wrong. My grandparents was from Giuliana Silicy they took a boat over here and had 11 more kids. My grandma made the BEST suka I've ever tasted, she always had fresh bread...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Walter, I've never heard of it... maybe we called it by a different name. What was it like (flatbread, loaf)???

My grandma made a fried bread for breakfast that was great... was it something like that???
 

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Not bread, it's the sauce for pasta, the only people I have heard call it that were my 12 aunts, uncles (who are gone) and cousins. I have tried several different recipes but have not got it right NOR close. When trying Ive used tomato sauce and brown sugar, but after talking with a cousin she said to use paste and white sugar but was not sure of the rest, she did agree on never tasting anything close NOR as good. My grandma passed when I was about 10 BUT I can still almost taste it. Don't think any of her recipes were wrote down OR no one has any. I'm 100% sure this was a recipe brought over from the old country BUT evidently not wrote down. Never was called spaghetti n meatballs back then, was always 'pasta n suka' (pronounced sooka) don't know the proper spelling tho....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Walter, check your PM...
 

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Shakshuka...

Wet Dream,

The sauce you describe sounds like "Shakshuka"

There are different versions all around the world.

Its a dish of tomato sauce with eggs, but could be easily served with pasta.
 

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No eggs, ranch got me one to try, he spelled it succo...
 

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Ok. I tried to do this on Sunday and it was a horrible failure. LOL!! I had 3hr playdough bricks when out of the oven.. Tasted like cracker. I am a pretty good cook but a terrible baker. This was my 3rd attempt at bread. I will continue to improve.

It never really did rise.

My mistakes

1) Used wrong flour (unbleached self rising instead of bread flour)
2) added the corn meal to the flour
3) forgot to hit 475 on the pre-heat
4) Possibly bad yeast or wrong kind
5) No baking stone
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
What can I say except follow the recipe & don't try to improvise...
 
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