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Borders, language, culture
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That's a cool shot. I bet that the train was only used close to shore. Where the water was deep enough, I can almost guarantee they brought the rocks in on a barge and dropped them in place with a crane.
 

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Give it hell Remy!
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Cool old photo! I wondered how they did that back then also.
 

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These Cats Are Potlickers
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1902. Two years after the Great Galveston disaster.

Biggie
 

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Yep...the corp of Non engineers is right:smile:

The Corps put out large wicker cylinders filled with sand. The plan failed. They tried again in 1880 with pinebrush and cane mattresses and again were faced with failure. Galvestonians were disappointed and angry and felt that funds had been wasted. But a battle ensued over the next 10 years over continued federal funding, who would build the jetty, design and a host of other problems. Finally, in 1890, the U.S. Senate approved the Galveston Harbor Bill.
 

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More There than here..Gone fishin....
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Too Bad most of the guys that built it are gone now..Id bet the stories of in process & stuff..Wouldve been really cool.
Oxx..
 

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Stuart said:
That's a cool shot. I bet that the train was only used close to shore. Where the water was deep enough, I can almost guarantee they brought the rocks in on a barge and dropped them in place with a crane.
The Brazos Santiago Jetties were also built exclusively with trains hauling the granite. You can actually see the stones of the old railbed on Brazos Island behind Boca Chica beach. Good snook fishing, too.

Cg
 

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Very interesting indeed! I had no idea the granite blocks are only the "cap" - the substructure being sandstone.

I take a tiny bit of issue with the statement

"Sandbars were developing in the harbor entrance. Between Galveston and Bolivar, a hidden menace was lurking and growing. From 1843 to 1869, pilots noticed a decrease in the deptha across 'the bar' from 12 feet to 8 feet. This forced some ships to have to wait for high tide before they could enter the harbor."

Not incorrect, probably, but accounts of Lafittes colony describe the bars as being an issue for the first Europeans to settle on the island. In fact, I can't remember the details, but I believe the privateers used the tides and the bars to evade the US customs fleet out of New Orleans, but it could have been some other event.
 
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