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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This was my first attempt, it turned out pretty good. 60 / 40 ratio venison to pork. I also mixed in garlic, onion, jalapeño and cheddar cheese. I smoked it on my propane smoker for 5 hours keeping the temp under 165.
 

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Next time, I would suggest using some sodium nitrite cooking at that low of temperature. Botulism will kill you. I've got 30 pounds in my smokehouse right now. I put a cure and phosphates in mine. Helps with that moisture retention and prevents botulism.

I hate to be critical, but I would also hate to see you or your family in critical care. Some others might want to chime in with some info.
 

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With that size diameter casing and 5 hours at 165 and no cure, scares the heck out of me. Somebody convince me otherwise, cause this is some dangerous stuff.
 

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Next time, I would suggest using some sodium nitrite cooking at that low of temperature. Botulism will kill you. I've got 30 pounds in my smokehouse right now. I put a cure and phosphates in mine. Helps with that moisture retention and prevents botulism.

I hate to be critical, but I would also hate to see you or your family in critical care. Some others might want to chime in with some info.
What? i never made any,but thought you could just mix up a recipe and go.Didn't know making links could hurt you? Glad i didn't try it.
 

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For all I know, there may be a different type of "Cure" that he used. I see a LEM box in one of the pictures and if that is his seasonings, it may have some kind of cure mixed in with it. I have just never seen a sausage come out brown like that with a modern cure mixed in with it. It usually comes out a mahogany color/reddish color like you see in the grocery stores.

Just because the outside temp is 165, doesn't mean the inside temp is the same. It takes a long time for the inside to reach that temp.

Botulism thrives at temps in the 40-140 degree range, with moisture and lack of oxygen. Perfect smokehouse conditions, inside of the sausage casings. I doubt the internal temp. reached 145 degrees in those 5 hours at less than 165.

He said the smokehouse temp was less than 165. He never said what the internal temp was inside the casing.

Google botulism and read up on it. You'll see why I am concerned.
 

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What? i never made any,but thought you could just mix up a recipe and go.Didn't know making links could hurt you? Glad i didn't try it.
Yep, there is more to it than that. Especially when smoking at low temps. Now if you throw some recipe together and stuff it into links and put it on the pit at 225, then there will be no problem. It is only when smoking at really low temps for long periods of time, is when you need the nitrite.(Cure)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The sausage is frozen now and I planned on fully cooking it before I eat it. Do you think that will be fine or should i scrap it and start over.
 

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I'd scrap it and start over. It'll probably have a rancid taste to it anyway, cause it almost has to be spoiled by now. You can try it, but cook it to a really high internal temp to make sure you kill any and all bacteria.

Cook a piece, you'll know real quick if it is edible or not.

When you do your next batch, lets us know. There are a few on here that make sausage alot and can guide you step by step, to ensure you have a great tasting sausage instead of an alright tasting sausage and also a safe sausage to eat.
 

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The sausage is frozen now and I planned on fully cooking it before I eat it. Do you think that will be fine or should i scrap it and start over.
Hmmm, I think that is a call only you can make. the standard rule is for the food not to be between 40-140 degrees for more than 4 hours, personally, less than three. The cure (sodium nitrite), is what allows you to keep the meat in the danger zone while smoking. You have to remember that is the internal temp, and not your smoker temp. so, by your post, you said 5 hours, but didn't say what your internal temp was. Just by looking at your sausage, I think your smoke house temps were higher that 165. Botulism is nothing to fool with, it isn't just a case of the runs...it can KILL you.

Dave

PS: Cooking does NOT destroy botulism toxins once they are formed
 

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For whatever it is worth - I always strive for an internal temperature of 180 degrees during smoking any product that does not contain cure. Two ounces of cure to 25 pounds of meat is always good insurance and can greatly reduce time/temperature required in smoking cycle. Zach's Spice company in Deer Park is a very good source for seasonings, casing, and cure compound. Cure also lends a uniform dark red color to the meat whereas a short smoke cycle can generate only a smoke rind and the center of your sausages will be gray in color.
 

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EJ, your right that Zachs has some good seasonings, but the sodium nitrite cure is used at the rate of 1 oz/25lbs. of meat. In smaller batches, 1 level teaspoon per 5 lbs of meat is the correct amount. Sodium nitrite is a poison, so don't want to use more than necessary.

Dave

For whatever it is worth - I always strive for an internal temperature of 180 degrees during smoking any product that does not contain cure. Two ounces of cure to 25 pounds of meat is always good insurance and can greatly reduce time/temperature required in smoking cycle. Zach's Spice company in Deer Park is a very good source for seasonings, casing, and cure compound. Cure also lends a uniform dark red color to the meat whereas a short smoke cycle can generate only a smoke rind and the center of your sausages will be gray in color.
 

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I called and talked to Zachs Spice company in deer park. One of the guys looked it up for me and said for the amount of salt we used, and the temp range we got the meat up to which was 150-200 in the box that the sausage would be ok for consumtion. Even if it had spoiled, we will be able to tell in the first taste. The meat didnt taste sour, just alittle salty. Very helpful business, would recomend them to anyone. They also said they would provide recipies for next time we try it out.
 

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Curious why so many people smoke their sausage for so long or even at all and then freeze it? Been making sausage for well over 10 years and never smoke any wet sausage. After stuffing and tying we hang it in the cooler to dry up some and then at the end of the day we wrap and freeze it. I only put smoke on the sausage once I go to actually cook it.

Dried sausage we smoke but we only put "cold" smoke on it and even then only for two hours max. It hangs and dries for about 10 days with a fan on it.

Also when putting cheese in sausage a "no melt" cheese is best to use.
 

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Thanks for correcting my error. I should have looked it up; for some reason two ounces just stuck in my mind.

I checked my cookbook at lunch time and sure enough the batch of venison/pork salami I made last week weighed 20 pounds and I used 0.8 ounces of cure.

As for smoked/unsmoked debate, I would say it is all a matter of preference. I have made several recipes with and without smoking and enjoyed all of them. Perhaps the only advantage to smoking before freezing is being to able to cook it quickly in a skillet indoors and still have good old-fashioned smoked flavor. Grilling unsmoked sausage outdoors on a semi-smoky fire does the same thing.
 
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