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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at a set of trailer bunk guide-ons (not the pole type) that have 2 support brackets on either side of the boat to attach a carpeted bunk. The height is not adjustable and will be near the top of the side of my aluminum boat, but not above the side. It's higher than most bunk guide-ons I've seen.

Would the height cause any type of problem loading/unloading the boat or any other problems?

The only potential problem I could imagine would be bending the support brackets, but these are made of heavy galvanized pipe, so I don't think that will be an issue. Otherwise, it seems like an advantage, but I may not be considering something.

Thoughts?
 

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I know what you’ve described, and I wouldn’t consider those things guide-ons, but i suppose anything that sticks up above the surface and is wider than where the boat sits when you’re driving it onto the trailer could be considered a guide-on. If I were you I’d only be concerned with running into them if you don’t steer the boat onto the trailer correctly, but it sounds like they’re pretty solid and you have an aluminum boat so you shouldn’t have to worry about hull damage either.
 

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My buddy has had them on his 18’ aluminum boat for 20 years. They work really well. Helps tremendously when trying to load in crosswind or strong current.


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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I know what you’ve described, and I wouldn’t consider those things guide-ons, but i suppose anything that sticks up above the surface and is wider than where the boat sits when you’re driving it onto the trailer could be considered a guide-on. If I were you I’d only be concerned with running into them if you don’t steer the boat onto the trailer correctly, but it sounds like they’re pretty solid and you have an aluminum boat so you shouldn’t have to worry about hull damage either.
In the research I've done they referred to them as bunk guides or bunk guide-ons. I've had the vertical pvc poles for years and they do help with the boat centering on the trailer when pulled out of the water, but they don't provide a great deal of help loading when there is a strong cross current. The boat pivots around them until the boat is most of the way on the trailer. No, I'm not backing the trailer in too far, but the ramp I use is very, very steep.
 

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My buddy has had them on his 18’ aluminum boat for 20 years. They work really well. Helps tremendously when trying to load in crosswind or strong current.

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My 2 flatbottoms have these on their trailer, they definitely come in handy when loading conditions aren't the best. And no, ihem being a little high shouldn't matter.
 

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In the research I've done they referred to them as bunk guides or bunk guide-ons. I've had the vertical pvc poles for years and they do help with the boat centering on the trailer when pulled out of the water, but they don't provide a great deal of help loading when there is a strong cross current. The boat pivots around them until the boat is most of the way on the trailer. No, I'm not backing the trailer in too far, but the ramp I use is very, very steep.
I agree, if you bump a pole when loading (usually when there’s a strong crosswind you’re trying to account for) it’ll throw the bow off and you need to start over. Always fun.
 

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Make sure that when loading the boat does not have the ability to get caught under them. You mention they are high.
 
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