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8 yr old dies...........

SAN DIEGO – Alan DeWeese says his lights were on when a Coast Guard boat rammed his 26-foot Sea Ray, killing his 8-year-old son and injuring five others on board.

The lights are just one reason witnesses and survivors are struggling to understand why the Coast Guard boat crashed into the packed recreational boat Sunday night at the 38th annual San Diego Bay Parade of Lights, a popular showcase for boats decked in Christmas lights.

DeWeese had borrowed his father's boat and invited two other families to watch the parade on its 5-mile route past downtown skyscrapers and the famed Coronado Bridge. The 33-foot Coast Guard patrol boat, meanwhile, was responding to a report of a grounded vessel.

"It seemed like it was going full speed when it hit," said Barbara Maloney, who watched from her 6th-floor hotel room. "We didn't notice them slow down at all. I assume they didn't see it."

The Coast Guard has not yet provided answers. It expressed condolences to the DeWeese family Monday and said three probes were under way. The National Transportation Safety Board sent investigators to San Diego, and the Coast Guard and San Diego Harbor Police also are investigating.

"We look forward to discovering what the facts were," Capt. Thomas Farris, commander of the Coast Guard's San Diego sector, told reporters Monday.

There were 13 people aboard the DeWeese boat Sunday. Anthony Cole DeWeese, 8, died in the crash. Two other children were injured and taken to Rady Children's Hospital, and three adults were transported to University of California, San Diego Medical Center, Fire Department spokesman Maurice Luque said.

None of the five people on the Coast Guard boat were injured.
Bob Furry was watching from his hotel room when he said he saw a boat blaze across the bay with a flashing blue light.

"We said, 'Jeez, it's going really fast.' We thought it was some kind of hot-dogger," he said.

Alan DeWeese turned around, but it was too late. He estimates the Coast Guard boat was traveling 35 mph to 45 mph and that he was moving no faster than 3 1/2 mph.

"I thought, why is he going so fast? I figured he was going to turn at some point but he kept coming at us," DeWeese, 44, told The Associated Press on Monday.

"He came up so fast I didn't have time to react," DeWeese said.
Roger DeWeese said his deceased grandson had been an ice hockey goalie.

"He was a spark plug," said DeWeese, who was not on the boat during the crash. "He liked just about everything."

The boy's father, also a hockey player, said his son enjoyed life to the fullest.

During the parade in San Diego Sunday, boaters festooned their decks with Christmas lights. In keeping with this year's theme, "Christmas at the Zoo," some participants dressed up as giraffes and pandas.


There were about 80 boats in this year's parade, from a 12-foot canoe to a 157-foot yacht.
The parade drew about 80,000 people on Dec. 13 and again Sunday, said Ron Sheehan, vice chairman.
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all i can say is that it was a tragedy.......
 

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what a hrroible thing to deal with especially when Xmas morning comes and he is not there. The capt of teh coast guard boat is obviously at fault but I think his punishment has already been rendered. He will have to live with the thought of killing that boy the rest of his life and that is as bad as any punishment they will give him.
 

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No his punishment has not been rendered. He committed some form of homicide either from negligence or stupidity. He is no different than anyone else and should face the full extent of the law. The Coast Guard is also at fault, there is no way to justify a high speed night-time maneuver in a crowded area over a vessel grounding.
 

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13 folks on a 26 foot Sea Ray is certainly a lot. It's a wonder more weren't killed. Prayers sent to the families involved.
 

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Gosh isn't that horrible? I can't comment on the story other than the Coasties have some mighty fast interceptor boats since 9-11, some capable of +50 MPH. These are the rigid inflatable boats or RIBs - not sure what was involved in the incident. The only faster boats I know are owned by Border Patrol, which has white mono-hull interceptors that can do +70 MPH.

With the increase in speed, there have been some accidents from Homeland Security boats. When the first RIBs were deployed at South Padre Island sub-station, one flipped during high-speed training maneuvers. The crew was alright but the engines weren't ... they had to tow the boat from the jetties to the shore upside down, and rent a crane to pull it out of the water. That's your taxpayer money at work!

The Navy Seals have even a faster experimental boat, a gray-black 80-footer that can do +80 MPH, built as a plant down by Pascagoula, a cat I think. The Navy had to build special seats like for jet fighters for the crew of this boat because the vibration, shock, and G-forces were so strong the test crews were pretty much hamburged.

So high-speeds are becoming a problem. A lot of the focus was because of "go-fast" drug and human smuggler boats, although the terrorist angle is a major aspect of interdiction. One interesting article I read was a proposal for unmanned coastal interceptors that act like Predator planes, which are driven remotely by joystick (video, radar, etc.). I don't know if that's such a great idea though, in preventing collisions like this one.
 

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Fish Assassin
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My take on it:

Coastie is hauling *** at night in a crowded area with lots of LIGHTS. In my experience, it is easy to not see nav lights when there are lots of other --and especially BRIGHTER-- lights nearby. It's trying to pick out one small green or red bulb out of a sea of LOTS of bulbs.

The CG should not have been hauling *** in this situation, but his not seeing the lights which were on is very believable. A safe mariner will slow his vessel in such a situation. It's like going into Galveston at night. There are tons of lights (Galveston, Texas City, range lights, channel marker lights) and it's easy to not see other vessels' nav lights. We slow down, and don't run the crew boat in the pass hooked-up at 27 knots. USCG should have known better. A grounding generally isn't a life-or-death situation.
 

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That's so inconsistent with what I've seen and known of the Coasties I can't believe there isn't going to be something bizarre show up in the investigation. A horrible tragedy either way, ,our prayers for the families of those involved and especially the little boy.
 

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The Antaginator
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wow...my prayers are with that family. I cannot imagine the feeling of losing your young son or daughter during the Christmas season...makes me sick inside.
 
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