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I'm searching for a good recipe for chicken and sausage gumbo. I had tasted many and I thought Crazy Cajun there in Seabrook had the best. Any suggestions?
 

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Go to HEB and buy the roux in the jar from LA. Follow the recipe on the jar. It's good.

6 lb broiler cut up
1lb sausage chopped
1/2 ts red pepper
1/2 ts black pepper
1/2 ts thyme
1 TS Tony's or slap your Mama
1 TS garlic minced or powder
1 cup each chopped onion, parsley, celery and green pepper
4 1/2 QTs water

Boil water. Mix in roux continuously until color is black. add everything else and bring back to a boil. Simmer 1 1/2 hr's. Debone chicken and after it cools put it back in and simmer 30 minutes. Serve with minute rice and french bread.
 

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Black roux is not real hard if you have patience. Equal parts oil and flour (not self rising), heavy bottom pan or pot, preferably cast iron, medim heat to begin stirring constantly but not fast, lower heat a little if flour is browning too fast, keepstirring until at least dark peanut butter color is reached, maybe a little darker. The darker the roux the less the flour thickens the stock and gumbo is not supposed to be creamy like gravy but should be rather thin. Try it and practice. You won't regret it.

Good luck, jdot
 

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one thing you could do if making your own roux is set a non-shiny penny down on the counter and stop when the roux is that color...... my favorite pan is heavy cast aluminum cuz it'll cool a little quicker'n cast iron if i have to lift it off the fire....... i can also walk away from it for a bit when i lower the fire or take it off where you'd have to stand right over cast iron and watch/stir it constantly start-to-finish

avoid letting it get too hot to the point of smoking...... it'll get a burnt taste

my mom can make it in a microwave but i've never seen her's come out as-dark-as mine w/o a burnt taste or smell

i've never bot a jar o'roux and only my own roux'll go in my gumbo.......

most people don't have a clue as to what gumbo is or what it should really taste like since it grew popular outside Louisiana state lines......... there's all kinds of soups and stews out there nowadays people call gumbo and trust me...... it ain't

there were originally only two types of gumbo,... and no,... i'm not talikng about chicken/sausage vs seafood,... i'm talking about the difference between cajun vs creole....... two different methods and ingredients (both made w/okra) and two differnt geographical areas of south Louisiana

i make cajun gumbo but i do know how to make a creole gumbo for those that might prefer it sometime

i wish i could offer up a recipe but the best i could do is to only list the ingredients.......... i've never measured anything in my life

and if anyone ever asks for my chicken/sausage gumbo (okra) recipe i always ask, "cajun or creole?" and then ask'em if they got about 5 or 6 hours to watch me while i make it...... seafood gumbo is quicker

and, of course, with the cajun chicken/sausage gumbo recipe the chicken can be replaced with duck, dove, squirrel, etc or in-addition-to....... i suppose you could with creole gumbo too but that just don't seem right to me

good luck with whatever you make
 

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it's not 'gumbo' without okra.......

'gumbo' is swahili for 'okra'.......

everything else some sorta soup or stew
"Ngombo" is Swahili for Okra, bastardized by the Cajun patois.....

Gotta have Okra though and a good black roux can be made quickly if you are very attentive and have your veggies prechopped (I'll expound).

1. Coat your chicken with some paprika (Or cayenne if you prefer), salt, and pepper or perhaps a little TexJoy then coat with flour

2. Fry your chicken at about 350 until done golden brown

3. Reserve the drippings and one cup of the oil used for frying, add to pan and turn heat up to med-high.

4. Add one cup of flour to pre-heated oil and whisk constantly. after flour thickens then starts to thin out again pay very close attention, it will start to brown and darken very quickly. Black Roux is about the color of extra dark bitter chocolate. When you reach this color take off heat and immediately put in your chopped okra and half of the other chopped vegetables (Onion, Pepper, celery) this will stop the roux from continuing to cook and also wilt/slightly saute' and carmelize the veggies.

5. Heat your stock to boiling and add the roux vegetable mixture one big spoon at a time.

5. Add your chicken and andouille and the rest of the veggies, and any additional spices you need (Good andouille precludes the need for additional spices in my book) turn down to simmer and let cook for another 90 minutes.

Let sit overnight and then reheat prior to eating. (This is important, anyone will tell you day old gumbo is better!
 

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My recipe

Blake's Chicken & Andouille Gumbo

Roux

1 ½ cups flour
1 cup oil

Whisk together the flour and oil until smooth and no lumps in a heavy microwave safe casserole dish (don't use anything plastic, corningware or pyrex only… this will get extremely hot) Microwave on high for 5 minutes then carefully whisk again or stir with a spoon to smooth any lumps. Microwave for another minute then stir repeating until the roux is the color of chocolate. It usually will not burn and will always be darker underneath the bubbles that form on top as it is cooking. If it burns you have to start over.

Gumbo Ingredients
1 onion sliced
2 sprigs parsley, whole
2 large onions chopped
1 5-6lb hen cut up or 4 lbs chicken thighs
2 large bell peppers chopped
1 ½ lbs andouille sausage sliced 1/4"
2 stalks celery chopped
1 gallon chicken stock
1 cup green onion chopped
1 cup white wine
1 cup parsley chopped
2 tblsp worcestershire
3-4 garlic cloves chopped
salt and cayenne pepper
1 large bag frozen cut okra

Boil chicken in a covered pot along with the white wine, an onion sliced, a couple of whole parsley sprigs, salt, cayenne and enough water to completely cover. After it comes to a boil reduce the heat to a simmer and let cook for 45 minutes to an hour. When it is done remove chicken to let cool and taste stock to see if it needs any more salt and cayenne. Add any skin or bones back into the stock after the chicken has cooled enough to work with and continue to let it simmer. Chop chicken meat coarsely. Strain the stock before using it.

Prepare the roux and when finished transfer (carefully) to another large stockpot set to medium high heat. Stir roux in pot until it begins to bubble again and then add the onions, green onion, bell pepper, celery and parsley. Continue stirring this mixture until the onions turn opaque. Next add 2 cups of the stock and stir, then the garlic and stir. Add the rest of the stock and then the thawed out okra (I usually just microwave the frozen okra in the plastic bag it comes in after cutting a vent in it, if you put it in frozen the roux will lose some of its color) then add the sausage and the Worcestershire. Turn the fire down to a simmer and cook for about 1-2 hours. After that taste the gumbo and see if it needs any salt or more cayenne and then add the chicken. Cook for 1-2 hours more and its done. It is usually even better after if has cooled off and been reheated and it freezes well.
 

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20+ years ago when I was working the marshes around Sabine NWR and Rockefeller SWR in extreme SW Louisiana I was lucky enough to dine in the kitchens of the local guys who were working for me. I ate a lot of "gumbo" but it never had okra. I was told that they were using file as their thickener and okra was a SE Louisiana thing.

Now I want to be very clear on this. I am in no way calling out Bill Fisher and HP. Both of those guys have demonstrated superior culinary ability and aesthetic recognition, I'm just curious whether I was getting "company" gumbo or the real deal. Over the years since my marsh adventures we have evolved 2 very different recipes, one with okra which we have been calling creole (possibly in error) and the sans okra Cajun version. They're both excellent but very different. Maybe I need new labels, but the recipes are darn good. Of course, what can a guy who grew up in Hidalgo County really know about Cajun anyway?

I'm sorry but buying bottled roux has to be some sort of sin against nature. It's not that hard to do if you've got some patience. BF, that oxidized penny trick is a darn good one. I can't tell you how many times I have tried to explain the difference between chocolate and peanut butter roux.

Blake, next gumbo I'm giving your recipe a shot. We have a lot of overlap but mine has never been anywhere near white wine and there are some other differences. I'll give you a full report.
 

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Bless me Father

For I have sinned with the roux from the jar.:rolleyes:
I fear I may sin again as half the jar remains:p
I make a mean roux. Sometimes if I lack the time or patience or if the troops are hungry I work faster. It's all good its gumbo. For those who have never seen a roux made its intimidating. Microwave simplifies though.
 

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I ate a lot of "gumbo" but it never had okra. I was told that they were using file as their thickener and okra was a SE Louisiana thing.

Now I want to be very clear on this. I am in no way calling out Bill Fisher and HP. Both of those guys have demonstrated superior culinary ability and aesthetic recognition, I'm just curious whether I was getting "company" gumbo or the real deal. Over the years since my marsh adventures we have evolved 2 very different recipes, one with okra which we have been calling creole (possibly in error) and the sans okra Cajun version. They're both excellent but very different. Maybe I need new labels, but the recipes are darn good. Of course, what can a guy who grew up in Hidalgo County really know about Cajun anyway?

I'm sorry but buying bottled roux has to be some sort of sin against nature. It's not that hard to do if you've got some patience. BF, that oxidized penny trick is a darn good one. I can't tell you how many times I have tried to explain the difference between chocolate and peanut butter roux.

Blake, next gumbo I'm giving your recipe a shot. We have a lot of overlap but mine has never been anywhere near white wine and there are some other differences. I'll give you a full report.
stay tuned!....... i'll be back to add a little more to this thread hopefully between now and the end o'the year

i think i'll even start a new thread for suggestions for the best redi-made, jar roux........... i know nothing about'em but would like to be able to suggest something to people that wanna learn how to make gumbo but don't wanna tackle making the roux themselves

right now,...... gotta go
 

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There's another thread that has the recipe that I use which is from Emeril. I have never tried the bottled roux as it's the key to a good gumbo IMO. The dark penny or a chocolate color is what I aim for, it takes me longer than 45 minutes it seems but well worth it.

I am starting some as we speak so the long process begins... LOL

Here's some pics of some I did a month ago or so.

Blonde Roux


Getting closer


Almost there


Trinity added to wilt


Sausage added


Stock added


This was pretty much the steps of the process, after the last pic was the seasoned chicken. It simmered from there for a few hours and then done. I didn't catch the finished product but I will try when this gumbo is done. :cheers:
 

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I've been using Haute's Recipe for several years now.
Wonderful !
Made some one week ago.

2 changes: 2 chickens instead of 1 chicken
2 lengths of sausage instead of 1 length.

I also purchased a hand held IR thermometer recently for fish frying and use it each time I bring the roux out of the microwave to stirr it. I try to not let the temp get above 380 deg F. When it gets close to the 375/380 mark, I shorten the time in the microwave. This keeps it from burning and allows the color to continue to darken.

good luck.
blue.dog
 

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20+ years ago when I was working the marshes around Sabine NWR and Rockefeller SWR in extreme SW Louisiana I was lucky enough to dine in the kitchens of the local guys who were working for me. I ate a lot of "gumbo" but it never had okra. I was told that they were using file as their thickener and okra was a SE Louisiana thing.
calling 'gumbo' w/o okra "Gumbo" i guess is more of a pet peeve with me........ i still think it's wrong like calling a canada goose a canadian goose (damned-near all geese are 'canadian') or people asking for 'advise' ;)

a good friend o'mine won the gumbo cooking festival in New Iberia one year and his 'bo' didn't have any okra it!.......... go figger that one out

oh well..... things and terms change over the years according to what some folk become accustommed to and tradition goes by-the-waste-side........ just like the cajun-french language has all but died off completely in south Louisiana...... it was beautiful to listen to but hard to understand even tho i took french in school..... my grandparents're dead now but both spoke it as if english was their 2nd language (my parents didn't tho)

anyway, your mention of okra vs file as a thickener is interesting cuz i 'slime'-the-hell-outta my okra before boiling it (actually, it's 'de-slime') and i also use file but only when a bowl is served....... it never goes into the gumbo during the cooking process cuz it'll make your gumbo 'stringy' (if you know what that means)

yup...... powdered sassafras leaves are an important addition to mine too but only when i serve it up

i can get away with using both okra and file because of the attention i give to (de)sliming the okra

here's one person's blurb on the subject......

For hundreds of years the Choctaw Indians have had a settlement at Bayou Lacombe on the North Shore of Lake Pontchartrain, and they had a way of making Gumbo long before the white man and the black man arrived. They invented filé (pronounced feelay). The tender green leaves of the sassafras tree are gathered, dried, and ground to a powder. Only a few tablespoons of the powder will thicken a whole pot of Gumbo and give it a flavor that's spicy and pleasant. The filé must always be added after the pot is removed from the fire. If allowed to boil, it becomes stringy and unpalatable. Okra and filé should never be used together in a Gumbo or it will be as thick as mud. The Creoles in New Orleans used filé only in the wintertime, when fresh okra was not available but many Cajuns prefer filé gumbo year-round. They pass a big bowl of filé around at the table, so that all the guests may take as much as they want.
 

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now i'm hungry. I cook gumbo in turkey roasters at church for a seniors group that my wife and I are the sponsors. I always have to make at least 1 cooker without okra and 2 with. Like to cook on wed. and serve on sat. Seems like the longer it sits the more flavor it has.
 
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