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"We're gonna need a bigger boat!"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this on the reports board and moved it here, I haven't had quite enough coffee this morning! lol

Had a problem develop with my Central AC over the weekend. Looks like my drain line clogged up and the condensate backed up and leaked through the insulation and soaked the sheetrock.
Is there any way to dry this out or am I looking at replacement? I was thinking of scooping out the wet insulation and putting a fan up in the attic to get to the wet areas from the top. Main wet areas are following the seams of the sheetrock.
Any ideas or suggestions would be appreciated!
 

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Isn't it absoluetely great ....

When there's a doctor in the house!
 

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Ken
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If at all possible, put a dehumidifier as close to the wet area as you can, and keep the tank dumped frequently until it dries out. The sooner it's dry, the less chance you'll have to replace anything.

Just be extremely careful to not put any pressure at all on that wet sheetrock. If it dries out without warping badly or crumbling, you'll probably be OK. You might need to put a coat or two of primer/sealer on it after it does dry, then paint it.

We had the same problem nearly 4 years ago, just after we bought this house. By time it was caught, the walls, baseboards, and of course our brand new carpet were thoroughly soaked in the hall and two bedrooms.

We bought a good dehumidifier and cranked it up immediately. I used my wet/dry vac on the carpets a few times the first day, too. Didn't have to replace anything.

You may already know this, but if not, here's a maintenance tip you might want to write down on your planner...

Each spring and mid-summer, if not even more often, take that A/C drain hose off where it connects from the drain pan of your inside unit.
(For safety purposes, you'll first want to shut off the breaker for your A/C. Besides, if it starts running and the hose isn't hooked up, you'll have a puddle soon.)

Using an air compressor or tank, stick an air gun into the hose. Wrap a wet rag around the end of the hose and squeeze it, so there's no blowback. Otherwise you'll get a good shower. Now, blow a few short bursts of air into the hose. Then, blow constantly for a minute or so.

Next, stick a funnel into the hose and pour a cup of bleach bleach down. After just a minute, blow the air as before, a few short bursts followed by a long constant shot. (Don't forget to wrap that wet rag around, otherwise the bleach facial is not healthy for the skin and eyeballs, not to mention your clothes and the carpeting. Oh, and if you want to live a long, healthy life, tell your wife what you're about to do, just in case she wants to take extra precautions, like covering the floor, locking out the kids and puppies, etc.)

DO NOT, repeat DO NOT try to be wise and blow some air up the fitting into the drain pan. You will make a HUGE mess if you do, and if there's rust or gunk in the bottom of that pan, you'll soon have another clog, believe me.

Now reattach the hose to its' original place on the drain pan fitting. Start up the A/C, and check to make sure you're not getting any leaks at the connection. If you are, you'll need a hose clamp. (However, the water isn't under much pressure, so it'll usually be OK to slip the hose on.)

Afterwards, if you go look outside where your hose drains, you'll find some little gobs of goo that would cause the clogging to happen again.

Note; if you don't want to drag a compressor into the house, go buy one of those pump-up insecticide sprayers, mix in a cup of water and a cup of bleach, pump up some good pressure, shove the nozzle down the hose, (using that rag for a seal), and let 'er rip.

Good luck!
 

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http://www.profishingresearch.co m
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Good job Aceup! I've found that if you pour some bleach or even put those bleach tablets in the drain pan every so often it will help the algea to knot clog up the drain line.
A secondary pan sure helps. Run it's discharge out to the patio and if it ever starts dripping then you know the primary pan is clogged. This keeps from ruining sheetrock.
The sheetrock help you gave is excellent. Same exact thing happened to Moms house a couple years ago. The inspectors are making them put traps on these drain lines and some of the contractors are leaving an opening in the pipe at the trap, like a vent or something. I haven't figured that one out yet. When the clog would happen it would back out that opening.

Air conditioning can be a pain sometimes,
can't live without it though.
Bigwater
 

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"We're gonna need a bigger boat!"
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tips guys!

After drying it out for a day or two with several fans up in the attic aimed to the sheetrock, there is no bubbling or warping. Whew! Just a few faint water stains that looks like I'll be able to repaint.

I went ahead and called an AC guy to come in a give my system a once over since I had so much water backed up into it. I always thought the only drain source was the pan, but apparantly there is a line going directly into the main house sewer. He pointed that little gem out and showed me where the access cap was and just like Aceupdj said, blew some compressed air to clear the line.
He also told me that if I see water coming from the outside drain line, it probably means the system is starting to get backed up and to go ahead and clean the line (he called it a P-LINE?) asap.
Did I to mention how much fun it is for a skinny guy like me to be up in a hot attic bent into a pretzel, kneeling on a 2x6 scraping out wet blown in insulation? lol
 

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Now, what I can add, due to experience, is over a period of time, my drain pan rusted, causing the sheet rock problems you mentioned. Howver, my whole ceiling fell in...So, you might want to consider a pan of aluminum, or ss, if you intend to stay in the house for a period of time

Yep, the drain into the sewer should be your main...the one outside, (maybe under the eave, somewhere) is the emergency drain...Just watch it, if it starts to dump water, you have a problem, somewhere
 
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