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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you need to bleed a BFT or a YFT asap? We caught some small tunny's and did not bleed them "big mistake" so I wanted to make sure that if we catch some better tuna that we will no mess it up.

Thank's, nelson
 

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Catching little tunnys is a mistake!LOL
YFTs and BFTs Yes bleed right away, rip a gill, stab behind the pec fin or anything else that you like but make them bleed and ice in a slush not on cubes. Tuna need to cool kwik and not be pounded into hard ice.
 

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Dick - 1972 Formula 223
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If they will fit, a 5-gallon bucket is handy for that. Bleed them head down into the bucket then rinse it over the side.
 

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It doesnt cost anything to set the hook
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then turn around and chum for shark with the bloooooddd!
 

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Iusedtofish
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wacker said:
Catching little tunnys is a mistake!LOL
YFTs and BFTs Yes bleed right away, rip a gill, stab behind the pec fin or anything else that you like but make them bleed and ice in a slush not on cubes. Tuna need to cool kwik and not be pounded into hard ice.
That sums it up.....
 

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Back in da Saddle
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Although the word Albacore is uses this still applies to all Tuna...

http://seafood.ucdavis.edu/Pubs/albacore.htm

Recommended On Board Handling Procedures

The following handling procedures were developed based on research and industry experience with albacore and other tuna species.

1. Prepare the Deck. Clean and sanitize the landing area and the slush ice tank or brine tank daily using detergent and water followed by a dilute solution of household chlorine bleach (one teaspoon per gallon of water). Have the slush ice tank, brine chilling tank or blast freezer ready to receive fish. With a slush ice tank, drain melt water from the ice and add seawater after the first strike. Chilling/freezing systems should be at the recommended temperatures when the first fish is landed. Have all handling equipment at hand and clean. These include knives, sharpening tools, gaff, and spiking tool or club. Use a landing mat (a piece of carpet) to reduce scale loss and bruising.

2. Landing. Land the fish as quickly as possible after it is hooked. Prolonged struggle will result in higher body temperatures and reduced quality. If you use a gaff, gaff the fish in the head or through the lower jaw, never in the body or you will destroy and contaminate the edible flesh. Keep fish in a single layer on deck rather than stacking them like cord wood.

3.Stunning. Stun the fish immediately after it comes on deck to eliminate scale loss and bruising. It is easier to stun the fish when it is still on the gaff or the hook remover. Club the fish with a modified bat, mallet, or lead filled steel pipe on the soft spot right above the eyes.

4. Brain Spiking (optional). Another option is to immobilize the fish immediately after, or instead of stunning, by destroying the brain. (Spiking the brain is a required procedure for production of sashimi grade tuna worldwide.) In addition to immobilizing the fish, brain destruction helps stop the production of heat and acid, and the loss of energy rich compounds.

To spike an albacore, position yourself so that you are balanced with the fish positioned on its belly, and the spiking tool (an ice pick or a sharpened screwdriver) firmly in one hand and the fish's tail in the other. Do not attempt spiking without complete control of your balance, the spiking tool, and the fish. Place the spike at the soft spot above the eyes at a 30 degree angle to the horizontal. Push the spike quickly into the skull maintaining the 30 degree angle while holding the tail with your other hand. Move the instrument from side to side to destroy the brain. The fish will shudder, all the muscles will flex, the mouth will open, and the pectoral fins will flare. After one or two seconds the fish will go limp if done properly.

If not done properly, the fish can shudder violently creating the potential for personal injury, and further scale loss and bruising to the fish. With slippery conditions this procedure can be a challenge, but after several attempts brain destruction is swift and thorough.

5.Bleeding. Bleeding improves the appearance of uncooked tuna loins and may help initially to reduce fish temperature on deck. It is essential for sashimi grade fish. Fish should be bled for 10 to 15 minutes after stunning (brain spiking) and then immediately chilled. Bleeding is most efficient when done immediately after the fish is landed, and when the heart is left intact to take advantage of its pumping action. If possible, orient the fish head down and spray with water to prevent clotting. Bleeding can be accomplished in at least three ways; use the one easiest for you. If one cut does not produce blood, try one of the other methods. Using more than one cut may promote more efficient bleeding.

Pectoral Cut: This cut is the most common in tuna fisheries worldwide. With the fish on its side measure 1.5 to 2 inches (about the width of two fingers) from the base of (under) the pectoral fin along the midline. Make a shallow cut about 1/8 to 1/4 inch wide and 1/4 inch deep along the raised ridge near the midline using a clean, sharp knife with a narrow blade. If this cut is made too deep or too wide, usable flesh can be destroyed and reduce the fish's value. Flip the fish over and repeat the cut on the other side. We found this cut to be very effective with albacore.

Gill Cut: The gill arch cut is the one most commonly used now in the U.S. albacore fishery. With the fish on its side, lift the gill cover and sever the gill arch and/or insert the knife behind the gill through the gill membrane, and cut up toward the spine, severing the blood vessels at the top of the gills.

Throat or Nape Cut: This cut involves cutting the blood vessel between the heart and the gills. It can be done in either of two ways, depending on the preference of the buyer. With the fish on its back or side cut the "V" shaped nape between the gill covers and the body of the fish to the artery just below the surface. An alternative that leaves the head firmly attached to the body is to make a shallow cut just inside the point of the "V" of the nape, lift the artery with your finger, and cut. The heart is about three inches behind or inside the point of the "V". Take care not to sever the heart or you will loose the pumping action the heart provides. Experienced albacore fishermen have variations of this cut that they find faster for them. We recommend finding the heart and the artery running between the heart and the gills in your first fish or two, and find what is easiest for you.

The amount of blood lost in the process of bleeding an albacore has not been determined. Albacore 12 pounds and over are between 8 to 12% blood by weight, with larger fish having the least percent blood4. You can generally drain only 20 to 50% of the blood from the fish because most of the blood is held up through surface tension and coagulation in many of the tiny capillaries that supply the muscles and make up the tuna rete system. A 12 pound albacore that loses 40% of its blood would lose about a half pound of its total weight: a nineteen pound albacore would lose between a half and three quarters of a pound in total weight. Bleeding will not significantly reduce the revenue received per fish.

Chilling and Freezing

Albacore should be placed into a chilling or freezing system within 15 minutes of capture to ensure the delivery of a high quality product without histamine. As a general rule, one day of shelf life is lost for each hour an albacore is left on deck. This rate of decomposition is three times that of other fishes. Rapid chilling should pose few problems during scratch fishing, however, it can be very difficult when large numbers of warm fish are caught within a matter of minutes. The only way to ensure safe, quality fish in this case is to match your capture rate to your refrigeration capacity. This may involve adding refrigeration capacity for the high scores, or reducing catch to ensure the safety and quality of the fish already on deck.
 
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