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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have several of them living around the lights and have enjoyed them for several years. We went to a pet store and they have a hugh on, about 8" long ($85.00), all the ones we have are around 5-6" long and we do see babies every year. My daughter has become fond of them and wanted one to care for as a pet. I started doing some information searches and have found very little, in fact very little has been know since 1971 according to all the facts including the State of Texas that has them listed as threatened. A permit is required to posses them so I guess another pet will be required. My question is this: Has anyone else seen them? I have found them (during the summer) almost everywhere I have looked at night, around front lights eating bugs.
 

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Geckos

I can tell ya one thing, they aint endangered at Cogen Lyondell. They are all over the place. Ive seen a few around the house but they are everywhere at work. I agree, they are fast. I tried catching one at home for the girls to see and he was untouchable.

Z
 

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Genesis 9:2-3 & Deuteronomy 12:15-16
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I heard the military/government has studied them to exhaustion wondering how they can support their body weight and hang upside on any surface. Nobody knows and it's still a mystery.

Nevermind, I heard wrong:

Recent scientific studies of the gecko have shown that the gecko has toe hairs which measure only a 10 millionth of an inch in diameter, and they have around 1,000 pads that conduct an electrodynamics force between molecules of the two surfaces--the hair and the surface over which the hair is moving. A set of toe hairs the size of a dime can lift 45 pounds. This is why a gecko can hang from the ceiling by a single toe.
The force produced by the hairs is amazing enough, but when the gecko runs, he has to attach and detach his feet 15 times a second. The gecko walks in such a way that they roll their toe hairs onto the surface and peel them off again--just like duct tape--only much better. Scientists are still studying this system for practical uses by man.

It is amazing enough that the force is there, but for the animal to have a walking style that allows it to attach and detach itself from the surface over which it is walking requires a variety of muscular and locomotion techniques that could hardly be the result of trial and error. The whole system is designed to make the animal able to survive and control insect populations in a dynamic way. They are very popular in Hawaii, but their method of walking upside down on the ceiling is still a wonder and a testimony to the designer who created them.
 

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Gecko Poop

Their poop has the same amazing ability to stick to any vertical surface. And it is very difficult to get off of the painted walls in my garage.

I shouldn't have any bug for miles with the number of geckos at my place.

I cringe when I see that GEICO commercial because I know what that thing did in the back seat of that car when he's singing...."Everybody was Kung Fu fighting."
 

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They haven't always been here on the upper coast. Like Grackles, white wings and stone crabs they've migrated up from the valley.
 

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The species is Texas Gecko. If you have them everywhere look inside your AC disconnects during the spring. Eggs will be in there. I'm covered up with them too. The Jack Russell loves 'em. I raised one when I was a kid. Get mealy worms from the pet shop. They keep in the frig. Mom hated that. By feeding them mealy worms they get fat and slow. Winter time they hybernate. Minw was fat enough to let him go in the house and I'd catch him when it was time to go back in his aquarium.

Bigwater
 

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More gecko info.

Mediterranean Gecko
Hemidactylus turcicus
Mediterranean House Gecko
Find books about reptiles and amphibians at amazon.com
Description 4-5" (10.2-12.7 cm). No eyelids. Toes unwebbed; clawed toe tips free of expanded pads. Translucent pinkish to white, with some darker blotching. Scales small, granular; rows of white keeled knobby tubercles down back. Round tail ringed with keeled tubercles and banded, especially in juveniles.

Voice Males squeak while fighting.

Breeding Under palm leaves and in crevices of tree bark and rocky outcrops. Most common in occupied buildings.

Range Introduced into peninsular Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. Also established in parts of Arizona. Native to Mediterranean area, Middle East, and India.

Discussion The most conspicuous gecko in North America. From twilight to dawn it can be seen darting along walls and ceilings to feed on insects attracted by lights. This lizard is highly territorial; males vigorously defend a favorite foraging area. Females are easily identified in spring and summer by white eggs that can be seen through the translucent skin of the abdomen

 

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to clear things up for yall

The geckos on our houses around here are the mediterranean gecko as stated previously, and are really common. The "big bend gecko" that started the thread probably isn't even one. I caught some in big bend many years ago under some rocks and thought they were big bend geckos, just because I was in Big Bend, but they are more than likely texas banded geckos, which look pretty much identical and are common.

Hoe that helped and keeps people from getting ripped off buying a "rare" gecko. The big bend gecko was first discovered in 1956, and none were collected again until 1971, so I doubt they would be selling them in pet stores. Besides, it's illegal to take any flora or fauna from Big Bend.

Chris
 

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Mediterranean Hitchhiking Geckos

They evidently got here on ships from across the pond. I never saw one until about ten years ago. Anybody know when they arrived? We have a car port that we used to have to clean the spider webs and dirt dobber nests out of weekly before the geckos arrived. Now we never see a bug, and I can't find anything about them not to like. I love 'em....
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
These are the Big Bend Geckos

had a positive ID on them. Also known as the Coleonys reticulatus. I was wondering because the store had one for sale. You do need a permit to keep them, as I stated in the thread so I guess you get it before you can take the Gecko. They are not lizards and have a very smooth silky skin. If you get a chance to watch one before it runs off, when they get mad they flip their tails just like a cat.
I thought they might be one of the banded geckos. I just wonder how threatened they are because there has been very little study done on them, one reason is they do not do well in captivity. We were looking at one last night on the window, I kept trying to get a photo of the underside, no luck. It would let us look as long as we wanted but if I got up, that thing was gone in a flash.
 

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Not lizards?

bill said:
They are not lizards and have a very smooth silky skin. If you get a chance to watch one before it runs off, when they get mad they flip their tails just like a cat.
QUOTE]

Bill, geckos are indeed lizards--trust me on this one. LOL

Since you have Big Bend geckos at your home (I'm guessing you live in the greater Houston area), there are probably more than a few herpetelogical organizations that would be interested in your unusual find. So would the folks at the Houston Zoo's reptile house. You outta consider giving them a call.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Sean

You are correct, I was refering to the green ones you see during the day. That is a very good idea about the zoo, I will be there on Monday so it would be perfect to ask around. I am going to try and get a few photos to take along with me.
 
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