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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I ran across a method where you put them in an icechest frozen, along with 2 cups of salt and a half gallon of orange juice and let the whole thing stand for 24 hours. I normally just leave them in the fridge, but that's out of the question doing 2 of them this year. Anyone ever tried doing them like that?
 

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Living life in the 77H20 zip code
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I'm brining mine this year for the first time. I read some posts in the cooking/grilling/bbq section on here and have decided to try it. Im putting mine in a 5 gallon bucket with water, sea salt (not kosher, better for you and from the ocean , so fits me better !) honey, molasses, apple juice and a host of other spices.

I'm going to put the turkey in the brine tonight and leave it in the brine until tomorrow afternoon and than smoke him. 5 gallon bucket is small enough where I can put it in the fridge in the garage to keep it cold. I'm not putting the bird in frozen, I thawed him out yesterday.

I'm anxious to see how it turns out.
 

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I'm a millionaire in a .02 opinion world
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Hadn't heard of that method. Sounds OK to me though. We are gonna have to fry over 60 birds for our fundraiser. All of which will see the brine bath. Supposedly helps with not having to dry of meat when re-heating. B&P
 

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"Wizards begin as blacksmiths"
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I'm bribing and smoking a turkey for the first time too. All input welcome!
 

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Fishmoore & Doolittle, Retirement Clubs
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I would never cook a turkey any other way. Doesn't matter if I'm roastin in an oven, smoking it or deep frying. If you haven't tried it you owe it to yourself (and your family) to do so. If it's too late for Thursday's dinner try it on a big chicken for supper later on.

There are as many recipes for brine as there are rubs for brisket. I use a honey/herb brine for mines.

Try to use a bird that's not already injected with all the "flavorings"/solutions from the processing plant.

Mont--I'm not sure about brining them frozen. I wouldn't recommend it. What if they dont thaw? And most of all, I cant see the brine doing its thing if it's frozen, even if it does thaw later in the process. I always brine mine thawed and use fresh birds. I use 2 of the big turkey roasting bags and let it brine in the fridge. If the bird is smaller I use a 5 gallon Igloo Water Cooler and add ice to keep it at a safe temp.
 

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Living life in the 77H20 zip code
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I would never cook a turkey any other way. Doesn't matter if I'm roastin in an oven, smoking it or deep frying. If you haven't tried it you owe it to yourself (and your family) to do so. If it's too late for Thursday's dinner try it on a big chicken for supper later on.

There are as many recipes for brine as there are rubs for brisket. I use a honey/herb brine for mines.

Try to use a bird that's not already injected with all the "flavorings"/solutions from the processing plant.

Mont--I'm not sure about brining them frozen. I wouldn't recommend it. What if they dont thaw? And most of all, I cant see the brine doing its thing if it's frozen, even if it does thaw later in the process. I always brine mine thawed and use fresh birds. I use 2 of the big turkey roasting bags and let it brine in the fridge. If the bird is smaller I use a 5 gallon Igloo Water Cooler and add ice to keep it at a safe temp.
Thats what I was thinking, but since I have never brined one, didn't know if you could do it frozen too.
 

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you can't take away my birthday
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Yes sir, a brined turkey or chicken is the owls hoot...
I like to brine the bird for 24 to 36 hrs. Then I use a Bradley smoker to cold smoke the bird for 4 hours with pecon. OK heres where it gets good, let it set to air dry in fridge for 2 hours to let skin dry out. THEN deep fry till done... SO- you have a brined, smoked ,deep fried Turkey bird that's alot of work but my my it is great!!!!!!:cheers:

Heres my brine...

Amount Measure Ingredient
  • 4 gallons water
  • 3 cups salt
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 4 tablespoons black peppercorns
  • 2 tablespoons granulated garlic
  • 1 tablespoon thyme
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
Directions:
  1. Combine all ingredients in a non reactive stock pot and bring to a boil
  2. long enough to dissolve salt and sugar.
  3. Cool completely and divide between two five gallon containers.
  4. Add two chickens or one turkey to each container and refrigerate over night.
  5. Rinse poultry; pat dry; season inside and out and prepare as desired.
 

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I'm brining mine this year for the first time. I read some posts in the cooking/grilling/bbq section on here and have decided to try it. Im putting mine in a 5 gallon bucket with water, sea salt (not kosher, better for you and from the ocean , so fits me better !) honey, molasses, apple juice and a host of other spices.

I'm going to put the turkey in the brine tonight and leave it in the brine until tomorrow afternoon and than smoke him. 5 gallon bucket is small enough where I can put it in the fridge in the garage to keep it cold. I'm not putting the bird in frozen, I thawed him out yesterday.

I'm anxious to see how it turns out.
Do you have a recipe for that brine? I am going to try my hand at the "brine and smoke" this year too.
 

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I use Alton Browns turkey brine recipe. It sure wakes up a turkey. And like was mentioned in an earlier I wouldn't throw it in there frozen.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/good-eats-roast-turkey-recipe/index.html

I pulled up the wrong one. This is the recipe I use that has orange juice in it. The recommendations were in the recipe when I got it.

Alton Brown Orange Juice Brine

1 qt vegetable stock, chilled (regular, not low sodium - that's important)
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1 tsp black peppercorns (I usually use more like 1 tbsp, but I like pepper)
2 bay leaves
1 qt. orange juice, chilled
2 qts. ice water

Bring 2 cups of the stock, the salt, brown sugar, peppercorns, and bay leaves to a boil. Dissolve the sugar and salt, and cut the fire. Add in the remaining stock, orange juice, and ice water. Once the brine has cooled to 40F or under, add the meat and keep in a cold place (under 40F). Brine for 8-48 hours.

This is enough for 2 chickens, one turkey, one pork butt, or about one tenderloin. For chickens, I like to skin and cut into quarters. You can fit one chicken's worth of quarters in a one gallon Ziplock baggie with enough room for brine. If I don't use the Ziplock baggies, I put everything in a food grade plastic bucket.

I regularly leave meat in this brine overnight with great results, and I do not hesitate to leave it over two nights.
 

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an easy way to brine a turkey is to put it in a (clean) kitchen garbage bag and then cover it with the brine solution - get out most of the air - tie it in a knot - then put it in another clean garbage bag for insurance

same idea when we wash something big - we put it in a clean garbage bag in a clean plastic garbage can
 

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yep going with honey and maple brine with wild turkey 101...planning to brine for about 15 hours (15 lb turkey)....I did read if you have pre-basted turkey or enhanced turkey then it has been injected with the saltwater solution so you may want to cut back a bit on the amount of salt in your brine. Planning to cook him on the Big Easy along with a ham.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
this is the article I read about using the ice chest...

Thawing a turkey can take two to three days in a refrigerator, or several hours in cool water, but I've learned a much better way to thaw and season turkeys than the usual thawing in cool water or in the refrigerator. It is called 'brining'. Brining a turkey ads moisture and flavor, but it is also an excellent way to thaw a turkey, accomplishing several things for one effort; my kind of cooking.

In an ice chest or water cooler, large enough to submerge the turkey, place the frozen turkey (after removing the wrapper). Don't worry about the giblets in the cavity for now. Heat a large pot of water and add two cups of salt and stir until the salt is dissolved and then allow the boiling water to cool.
Turkey meat needs some salt for flavor. We are so paranoid about salt, recently, we tend to avoid it. We also have a conception that salt dries meat, so why add it to the brine? I'll ignore that it wouldn't be brine without the salt. By the time the salt permeates the meat, there will be very little added salt but just enough to improve the flavor, and it needs to be quite salty to promote "osmosis through a semi-permeable membrane." (the turkey, in this case)
Add to the salt water, as it cools, a quart of orange juice. The citrus and sugars will also permeate into the meat, adding more flavor but will be unnoticeable. The citric acids are also tenderizers. The salt and citrus both are natural preservatives, which will help the leftover meat keep better, and anti-bacterial, which makes it even safer than normal thawing techniques.
If you read the instructions on brining a turkey, it will recommend adding ice to the water. As we are thawing the turkey, the frozen turkey is the ice, so skip that part. It dilutes the salt and orange flavors, and isn't necessary. Pour the now cooled brine water over the turkey until it is completely covered. Close the ice chest and allow it to sit for twenty four to thirty hours in a garage (in the winter) or any cool area. It won't ruin, I promise.
The next morning, remove the turkey. Remove the giblets from the cavity, and now I digress from the title. Cooking the turkey correctly is also important. You have a perfectly and safely thawed turkey in one day, without occupying any refrigerator space.
 

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Fishmoore & Doolittle, Retirement Clubs
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Mont - I'm thinking that the hours that the bird remains rock hard BEFORE it starts to thaw it isn't getting brined. Nothing wrong with this method if you add a those hours to the brine process and check it as time progresses. Towards the end it would be a good idea to make sure it doesn't need more ice too. We don't want want it sitting over 40 degrees for too long.

Just my 2 cents.... My absolute worse fear when cooking a big meal for a crowd is that something will happen to the main course. I use only tried & true methods on these occasions and experiment at other times.

Happy Thanksgiving!
 

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I ran across a method where you put them in an icechest frozen, along with 2 cups of salt and a half gallon of orange juice and let the whole thing stand for 24 hours. I normally just leave them in the fridge, but that's out of the question doing 2 of them this year. Anyone ever tried doing them like that?
Haven't tried it yet, but we're about to with the kit from Williams Sanoma. Supposed to turn out moist....we'll see. Good Luck to both of us!
 

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Right wing nut job, Bitter clinger to 2C
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I used #1 cure, injected 1.8 lbs of it inside a 16 lb bird. and then soaked it in the cure with ground rosemary, sage ,thyme, in the fridge for 48 hours.. I took it out tonight and soaked it in cold water for 2 hours to get the salty taste out and will let it dry cure for tomorrow in the fridge..

I will put it in the smoker at 140 for 3.5 hours with super smoke till the external temp reaches 130 and then turn up the smoker to 210 and let her cook till internal temp is between 165 and 170... slow cured smoked turkey......:wink:
 

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It's fish spelled backwards!
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Emergency turkey cooking method: If your turkey is frozen and needs to be cooked within 24 hours. Stick it in a (clean) bathtub filled with hot water and let it sit overnight. It will be thawed in the morning.

That is just for fast thawing, not for brining. Guess you could salt the water...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just my 2 cents.... My absolute worse fear when cooking a big meal for a crowd is that something will happen to the main course. I use only tried & true methods on these occasions and experiment at other times.
You only live once, my friend, and each day I wake up and see the sun shining, I give thanks. Then I have fun.

What you never try, will never work.

If you don't take a chance every once in a while, you aren't living. You are just getting by.

The rescue Bloodhound, Blue is sniffing around. It can't be that bad. ;)
 

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